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Free Scholarship: NORML Seminar In Aspen For Marijuana Activists And Attorneys

  • by Allen St. Pierre, NORML Executive Director April 4, 2009

    Colorado NORML is pleased to announce the second annual Hunter S. Thompson Scholarship to attend the NORML Aspen Legal Seminar!

    The NORML Legal Committee’s Annual Aspen Conference (which is a continuing legal education seminar for practicing lawyers) is scheduled for June 4th and 5th, 2009, at The Gant. Colorado NORML, is presenting the scholarship, which covers three nights lodging and the conference registration fee, to an attorney or cannabis law reform activist who, by written submission, demonstrates 1) a desire to improve public advocacy and/or trial skills related to representing cannabis consumers in the courts (criminal, medical, and more), 2) a demonstrated need for financial assistance to attend this year’s Aspen Legal Seminar.

    The value of the scholarship is approximately $1000.00.

    Some of the finest defense attorneys (and cannabis law reform activists) in the United States have been coming to NORML’s Aspen seminar for many years to learn, enjoy the inspired environs of beautiful Aspen in early summer–and to do so at VERY reasonable rates. This year’s seminar focuses on state and federal medical marijuana laws, and is a MUST educational opportunity for medical marijuana patients, providers, cultivators, as well as for criminal defense attorneys (and public defenders, who receive a discount to attend).

    Check out this year’s informative and interesting schedule here. The social events, including a great, private dinner catered by Cache Cache’s Chris Lanter, are included with the scholarship.

    Criminal defense lawyers, public defenders, cannabis law reform activists, medical marijuana patients and their providers from the 13 states with medical cannabis laws are strongly encouraged to attend (HI, AK, WA, OR, CA, NV, NM, CO, MT, MI, RI, VT and ME).

    Submission for this year’s Hunter Thompson Scholarship is by fax, mail or email. The scholarship is awarded by the CONORML board of directors, please direct your submissions ‘Attn: Steve Wells’ at: swells@conorml.org,  (303) 725-0774 (f) by April 15, midnight Rocky Mountain High time–and we hope to announce the recipient of the scholarship on April 20th, 2009.

    Colorado NORML
    PO Box 492
    Longmont, CO 80502

    The submission word count rule will be strictly enforced. Submissions may be of any length…


    17 Responses to “Free Scholarship: NORML Seminar In Aspen For Marijuana Activists And Attorneys”

    1. Jake says:

      ‘The submission word count rule will be strictly enforced. Submissions may be of any length…’

      What?

    2. AAAAHHHHH Aspen! Scholarship Awards add a nice touch of class and honor to meetings. Thanks NORML! I can’t wait to be strongly incouraged to attend your Seminars because I’m from Tennessee.

      TN Bills SB 209 & HB 368

    3. Darrell Kilgore says:

      Maybe a Public Invite to all “lawyers”and then get them High near the mile high.LEGALIZE

    4. Jeff says:

      Legit Potheadz…

      But yall Ready know

    5. Rick says:

      For all you folks who were at Hash Bash in Ann Arbor yesterday, thanks for making it the best I have ever been to. The weather was great and the vibe was terrific. Be good

    6. Da Vinci says:

      Wish I could make it. Hope Norml puts video of this seminar out, so we can all learn together and be on the same page.

    7. Anonymous says:

      If the County Sheriffs of Colorado has its way, law-enforcement agencies will soon be able to take your house, cars, cash and jewelry, sell it off and divvy up the proceeds quietly and privately among themselves. This organization, which lobbies for the interests of sheriffs across the state, is the force behind House Bill 1238, which rolls back a 2002 law guaranteeing Colorado residents reasonable protections against “asset forfeiture” — a fancy legal term for when the cops use the force of law to take your stuff
      House Bill 1238, sponsored in the house by Rep. Joe Rice, D-Glendale, and in the Senate by Sen. Brandon Shaffer, D-Boulder, would wipe away the 2002 reforms that curbed law-enforcement abuses.

    8. David D says:

      How can the submission word count rule be strictly enforced when there is none?

    9. #9 David D Says:
      April 6th, 2009 at 12:45 am

      How can the submission word count rule be strictly enforced when there is none?

      RE:
      Perhaps a ‘wink’ emoticon following the word-count rule statement would clarify its meaning:

      “The submission word count rule will be strictly enforced.
      Submissions may be of any length… 😉 “

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