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American Universities: The Medical Cannabis Conundrum

  • by Allen St. Pierre, NORML Executive Director May 24, 2012

    Going back to at least 1998, NORML has been receiving complaints from parents and students that while the state where the university is located has legalized medical cannabis use and possession, because of the federal government’s recalcitrance and ‘flat earth’ view on cannabis’ medical utility, the student is threatened with sanctions or expulsion if they get caught with a lawful medicine.

    Seventeen states and the District of Columbia have legalized medical cannabis, more states are expected to soon join the cohort. The issue of medical cannabis on campus is a real and serious one.

    National Public Radio examines the growing and untenable friction between state and federal laws regarding cannabis, with a profile from southern Maine.

     

     

    11 Responses to “American Universities: The Medical Cannabis Conundrum”

    1. The American Genesist says:

      As a “Sacrament of our Faith [Genesis I:29,30,31]” – we do not seek “exemption” from the Law of the Land – because – the Law of the Land [the Establishment Clause in the First Amendment of the Constitution of the United States of America] – and – Religious Law support and uphold each other.

      As God’s Sacramental Medicine – Genesists recognize and serve its medical efficacy – of which has long been regarded as the “Number One Medical Plant” of 10,000 medical plants – treating more than 250 medical conditions.

    2. […] American Universities: The Medical Cannabis Conundrum Going back to at least 1998, NORML has been receiving complaints from parents and students that while the state where the university is located has legalized medical cannabis use and possession, because of the federal government’s recalcitrance and ‘flat earth’ view on cannabis’ medical utility, the student is threatened with sanctions or expulsion if they get caught with a lawful medicine. Seventeen states and the District of Columbia have legalized medical cannabis, more states are expected to soon join the cohort. The issue of medical cannabis on campus is a […] […]

    3. It should start with the University and the Professors themselves don’t put the students in the crosshairs. This is a no brainer.
      The University and Professors should write a letter to the Governor of the State telling them that they believe more can be learned from studying cannabis which is currently being used as medicine in their state and we also believe that by further study the possibilities could open up large revenue streams in many different venues that would not only be beneficial for current University students and faculty but enhance the lives of the business and rural community as well.

      The plant is the most important part of medical marijuana or legalization. It’s the plant that has the potential and that potential is enormous.

      The first state that does this, that tells the federal government that they should concentrate on other matters and then make a stand, you might look over your shoulder and find a lot of friends who will fall in step right with you and give presence to your position and gain acceptance as the right action to take. I know it would be the very best moral position for the issue that I know.

      Who will lead? Who will be the first to lead?
      Send letters, talk to your students, gather support and make a stand…Quickly.

    4. Fireweed says:

      If we really want to show the world that legalizing mj won’t create chaos, a reason upheld for the downfall of Prop19 in Cali, then why can’t the 25 y/o student who lives off campus just smoke at home BEFORE he leaves for class? Why is it an issue that he can’t bring it and smoke it on campus? you wouldn’t see people walking around campus with a beer would you?

      I’m as much for full legalization as anybody, but I just think that if we want to the general public to take us seriously on this issue and be more amenable to legally regulating marijuana, then we need to show them that it won’t produce the type of chaos that they fear.

      Maybe in time the truth about this wonderful herb will be made known and people will realize that it won’t produce a stumbling sea of the masses, but for now I really think our best bet is to work with people’s mindset where they’re at and show the world how it’s really not a threat to anybody.

    5. Robyn says:

      Using it at home and then driving whether it’s pot or beer would put someone at risk for DUI and doesn’t make sense because the medicinal effects of pot would be worn off after 20 minutes of driving anyway. Cannabis curbs chaos and society has begun to realize that already. Allowing use of medical marijuana on campus cuts down on risk of DUI and doesn’t hurt anybody else. Not allowing it is essentially putting the handicapped parking spots on the outskirts of campus for disabled cannabis patients. Thanks for the support!

    6. jbkorn02 says:

      Anyone who has ever tried smoking weed that has also tried drinking knows how much worse the drinking is for your body, mind, and people around you. All I want is a law that doesn’t make me a criminal for laying down at night and smoking a joint before watching some tv or reading a book after a long day at work. As of now the Obama administration thinks that I should be locked up or at the very least fined for what I do. What country was the “land of the free”? I want to move there.

    7. […] limiting the sanctions for having cannabis made the increasing consequences for a 1st- time liquor offense to create equality of the two. Yet, […]

    8. […] limiting the sanctions for having cannabis made the increasing consequences for a 1st- time liquor offense to create equality of the two. Yet, […]

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