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Nevada: Governor Signs Cannabis Dispensary Measure Into Law

  • by Paul Armentano, NORML Deputy Director June 13, 2013

    Republican Gov. Brian Sandoval has signed legislation, Senate Bill 374, authorizing the creation of up to 66 not-for-profit [correction: facilities may be for profit] medical marijuana dispensaries.

    Under the new law, state regulators are tasked with overseeing the creation of licensed establishments to produce, test, and dispense cannabis and cannabis-infused products to authorized patients. Nevada voters enacted a state constitutional amendment in 2000 mandating state lawmakers to allow for physicians to authorize qualified patients to consume and grow cannabis. However, that law did not provide for facilities where patients may obtain medicinal cannabis.

    Approximately 3,800 Nevadans are presently authorized to grow and/or consume cannabis under state law.

    Senate Bill 374 imposes limits on the home cultivation of cannabis if patients reside within 25-miles of an operating dispensary. However, patients who are cultivating specific strains of cannabis not provided by a local dispensary may continue to engage in the home cultivation of such strains. Patients who have an established history of cultivating medical cannabis prior to July 1, 2013, also may continue to do so until March 31, 2016.

    The bill also amends possession limits from one-ounce to two and one-half ounces and increases plant cultivation limits from three mature plants to twelve.

    Medical marijuana products dispensed by state-licensed facilities will be subject to standard state sales taxes as well as a 4 percent excise tax, of which 75 percent will be directed to education and 25 percent will be directed toward implementing and enforcing the regulations.

    Arizona, Colorado, New Jersey, Maine, and New Mexico have state-licensed medical cannabis dispensaries up and running. Similar dispensary outlets are in the process of opening in Connecticut, Massachusetts, Rhode Island, Vermont, and Washington, DC.

    13 Responses to “Nevada: Governor Signs Cannabis Dispensary Measure Into Law”

    1. Jonathan says:

      It’s pretty amazing that marijuana is still illegal in Nevada for recreational use, I mean considering the fact that you can walk into a legal brothel. Not that I think that should be illegal as it hurts no one, but I think it says a lot about how people still view marijuana.

    2. ONCE THE FEDS SEE HOW MUCH MONEY THE STATS ARE MAKING, THEY WILL JUMP ON BOARD. MONEY TALKS.

    3. Ben says:

      Interesting, and seems to be another step in the right direction…

      NORML highlighted part of this:
      “…authorizing the creation of up to 66 not-for-profit [correction: facilities may be for profit] medical marijuana dispensaries.”

      My question is, in your understanding,
      is that a significant difference, relative to legislature, etc. for it to be FOR profit vs non-profit? Or does it play out about the same?

    4. Cleve E. Littlefield says:

      The part of the bill depriving patient’s of the right to grow their own med is unAmerican, unconstitutional and just wrong! It forces patients to pay high dispensary prices and caters to big business and the wealthy. Fixed income patient’s are screwed.

      [Paul Armentano responds: The measure actually increases plant limits for home cultivators in the interim. There are no limits on home grows until March 31, 2016 and only then the limits only apply if one resides within 25-miles of a dispensary. And there are several exemptions, including a hardship exemption, for patients who do so and wish to continue to still grow after this date.]

    5. Darrell says:

      The Republicans sure know how to get re-elected!

    6. Dave Evans says:

      “However, patients who are cultivating specific strains of cannabis not provided by a local dispensary may continue to engage in the home cultivation of such strains. Patients who have an established history of cultivating medical cannabis prior to July 1, 2013, also may continue to do so until March 31, 2016.

      The bill also amends possession limits from one-ounce to two and one-half ounces and increases plant cultivation limits from three mature plants to twelve.”

      This seems amazingly progressive. Can this be used as a model for other States?

    7. Nice says:

      Good for Nevada. Their MMJ law needed fixing, badly.

    8. There is actually no such thing as a “non-profit” dispensary. No one is going to just give thousands and thousands of dollars to someone to open up a shop with no promise of return. We will be better off by being upfront and just running legitimate businesses.

    9. Cleve E. Littlefield says:

      Waivers to grow your own meds are going to be very difficult to come by for average poor patient who can’t afford dispensary prices. Many of us made the investment in a grow op because we could not afford $60 an1/8th prices for average meds. This bill legalized “for profit” shops and we are being forced to give them that profit! A two year waiver for pre July2013 card holders is nice but should be permanent. The amortization of a grow op investment is a lot longer then two years for a patient on a fixed income. If anyone thinks that prices are going to drop now their very,very high!

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