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Julie’s Baked Goods Joins the NORML Business Network

  • by Sabrina Fendrick September 8, 2014

    Julie's 2-c logoNORML is pleased to announce the newest member of the NORML Business Network; Julie’s Baked Goods.  The Denver-based edibles company produces of some of the highest quality, all-natural cannabis snacks in the state, and is also a prime example of responsible labeling among infused food companies.  Formerly known as Julie & Kate’s Baked Goods, the inspiration behind starting the business came when both women were dealing with a serious illness and agreed that marijuana could be beneficial to managing their symptoms. What started as a friendly trial, with a bag of weed in a domestic kitchen in 2008, has turned into one of the leading marijuana edible companies in Colorado.

    The product line for Julie’s Baked Goods is geared toward “foodies” and health conscious consumers.  Items have turned out to be especially popular in Boulder, and among the senior crowd.  Each creation starts with clarified butter or coconut oil that is infused with specific strain of organically grown marijuana and is slowly heated to carefully extract every last bit of activated cannabinoids. They use only premium, all-natural ingredients for their gluten-free THC infused edibles. The founders built product testing into the budget of their business plan before they even opened – unlike most of the other marijuana companies around at JKBG Aug 14 Ad2that time. The company has nearly a half-dozen products, including a fresh granola snack, a roasted Seed Mix (which took 1 year to develop), the Nutty Bite (37 recipes), the Groovy Granola Bar and clarified cannabutter.

    “Consume ¼ of the package, wait 60 minutes, eat more if necessary. Try eating with yogurt, milk or other healthy food. Fat facilitates THC digestion and intensifies psychoactive effects. If you over ingest: drink water or tea, avoid eating fatty foods. Onset: 45-60 minutes after ingestion. Effect Duration: 4-10 hours. First Euphoric Peak: 2 hours. Second Euphoric Peak: 3-4 hours. Please Plan Accordingly.” – Text from the label of a Julie’s Baked Goods product

    Most notably, Julie’s Baked Goods has been on the forefront of responsible edible education for consumers from the beginning.  Since their first sale in 2010, the company has been a model of proper labeling (prior to the implementation of labeling laws), dedicated to making sure that the consumer is prepared for the experience.  Products include information about the recommended amount, the onset of the high, how long it might last, certain foods that can intensify the feeling and how to mitigate the negative effects of over ingestion.  When Colorado implemented new edible labeling laws a few months ago, they didn’t have to change a thing.

    Julie’s Baked Goods is a wonderful example of how the industry can be proactive about incorporating responsible business practices and self-regulation into such their burgeoning market.  The products are sold in over 125 different cannabis stores around the state, including locations such as Preferred Organic Therapy in Denver, and The Farm in Boulder.

    Throughout every facet of their business, Julie’s Baked Goods has gone above and beyond the letter of the law, setting a standard that embodies the ideals of corporate social responsibility, and the principles of the NORML Business Network. This is how an edibles company does it right.

    **Julie’s Baked Goods is a licensed and regulated marijuana business whose products can only be purchased in the state of Colorado, either by medical marijuana patients or retail customers who are 21 and older.**

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    For more information about joining the NORML Business Network go to www.norml.org/businessNORML Business Network

    3 Responses to “Julie’s Baked Goods Joins the NORML Business Network”

    1. Julian says:

      Wish there was labeling on genetically engineered crops. Thanks for setting the example with the pleasantly modified crops, Julie.

    2. Galileo Galilei says:

      Apparently someone was making snack sized bags of infused edibles. Some folks thought they should eat the whole bag, so overdid it.

      It is natural to assume a snack sized bag should be consumed in a single setting. If you buy a little bag of potato chips for lunch, you often eat the whole bag with your sandwich (or whatever).

      I’m not sure if we should just avoid that kind of packaging or just put warning labels on the bags.

      The good news is even if you do overdo it, you won’t die suddenly from you error.

    3. mexweed says:

      One of the favorite Habits of Crapaholizm is to market foods (especially full of sugarfat, hmmm) in nonresealable containers so the buyer “just feels” it’s more convenient to finish it off hurriedly (or throw part away, they still make their money).

      Good idea for cannabizfood marketers to aim for a principled policy here, try to look MORE honest than the morons who predominate in “fa(sss)t foods”. Use a container which is interesting and rewarding to keep, carry, reuse, maybe with instructive poetic readable texts on the outside like a certain carry-out food brand, Chi—–, does.

      (Then when user carries some other food in the same container later you still get the advertising value.)

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