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Poll: Majority Of Americans Say Make Marijuana Legal

  • by Paul Armentano, NORML Deputy Director June 7, 2016

    legalization_pollThe majority of US voters believe that the adult use of cannabis ought to be legalized, while more than nine in ten Americans endorse allowing its use for therapeutic purposes, according to the results of nationwide polling data provided by Quinnipiac University.

    Fifty-four percent of respondents say that the “use of marijuana should be made legal in the United States.” Support for legalization is strongest among those age 18 to 39 (69 percent), Democrat voters (65 percent), Independents (61 percent), and males (60 percent). Support is weakest among Republicans (36 percent), those over 65 years of age (37 percent), and female voters (47 percent).

    By contrast, super-majorities in all demographic categories — including 94 percent of Democrats, 93 percent of Independents, and 81 percent of Republicans — support permitting physicians to authorize medical marijuana use to qualified patients.

    In response to a separate polling question, 87 percent of respondents agreed with a recently enacted Congressional amendment authorizing V.A. physicians to recommend cannabis therapy to military veterans in states that permit it.

    The poll’s results are similar to those of numerous recent national surveys, including those by CBS News, the Associated Press, and Gallup showing majority support for marijuana law reform.

    23 Responses to “Poll: Majority Of Americans Say Make Marijuana Legal”

    1. Gene says:

      That’s great but the sad fact is this country is no longer about the will of the people. It’s about what our owners say what we can and can’t have

    2. Mark Mitcham says:

      When it comes to marijuana legalization, there is, and will continue to be, a learning curve for everybody.

      The existence of super-majorities in support of medical cannabis suggests that, in general, Americans are no longer falling for the most blatant forms of “reefer-madness” propaganda (finally!) But more impressively, we are becoming more knowledgable about cannabis’s medical properties.

      Legalization promotes knowledge, and vice-versa. I don’t think the full medical benefits of cannabis can ever be fully realized until it is completely legal for everyone, even so-called “recreational” users.

      As a stoner, and a medical cannabis patient, I’ve been learning, too. I’ve begun to think more in terms of “wellness” than “sickness.”

      I quote Steve DeAngelo from his book “The Cannabis Manifesto; A New Paradigm For Wellness”:

      “the term ‘recreational use’ has become the catchall phrase to describe all consumption of cannabis that is not ‘medical.”

      and,

      “I used to be locked into an outdated illness concept of human health that views us as either sick or healthy. […] But human health actually operates on a spectrum of wellness. That spectrum occupies the space between perfect health and acute sickness, and is where most humans spend the majority of their lives. […] The best ways to preserve wellness are safe and non-invasive.”

      Like cannabis.

      • mexweed says:

        Thanks for the DeAngelo quote, rather than think about perfect health (the enemy of the good just like in cannabis legalization formulas) I try for a space at the top of the wellness spectrum which we might name ROBUST HEALTH.

        I think what our owners, as Gene puts it, want to own is our spending money which they propa & ganda-ize us to spend on their stuff. Cannabis legalization will massively reduce oligarch profits! Today legal tobackgo $igarettes are a $400-billion/year biz, bootleg squares maybe a similar figure, once weed is widely substituted even pack-a-day Puffers will get the hint and switch to LOW-PROFIT vapepens and flexdrawtube oneheaters (see free wikiHow article “12 Easy Ways to Make 25-mg Microdosage Vapetoke Devices”).

        To show that what we do is not out of hate for the scab workers who now help grow and make overdose tobackgo products, we (NORML and all) must ostentatiously Forgive and Forget and Former-Foe-Payoff, and help to promote OCCUPATIONAL retraining programs for them and, yes, let them make some of the money off the cannabis biz upsurge too.

        Agree with you, the trickily spelled catchall phrase “recreational use” is confusing and needs to go. Well, we know alcohol is the number one WRECK-creational drug, hey? Let’s campaign to get INSPIRATIONAL (encourages me to do my work) and OCCUPATIONAL (helps me do my work better) recognized.

    3. DonE says:

      For some reason, legal marijuana is even more difficult for our legislators to accept than gay marriage. Must have something to do with money, because it makes no sense.

      • lockedoutoftheshed says:

        you are correct because gay marriage does not interfere in big business like cannabis and hemp would. so, because big business and their lobbyists runs our country….

      • fireweed says:

        it especially makes no senses given Republican’s supposed distaste for “excessive government oversight” and “nanny-state laws.” That seems to apply to everything except marijuana. methinks it has to do with profits.

    4. Julian says:

      The percentage for women who approve marijuana legalization were above %50 in the CBS poll and climbing in every other poll. No matter how the Superdelegates vote or how Bernie does in California tonight, we are gaining strength in Congress with Bernie supporting candidates supporting marijuana legslization and women like Senator Gillibrand D-NY are helping to lead the way. Hillary can’t go on denying this fact from her base. As for Washmoney-Shultz, her prohibitionist time is up.
      http://Www.Timcanova.com

    5. TheOracle says:

      Those 65 and older have the least support for legalization. They basically have their minds made up about cannabis, and damn all the science and facts they aren’t changing their minds.

      The average age of someone in Congress is 57. Some are younger, but the longer you serve and more seniority you get the more preference you get in which committees and committee positions.

      Basically, the power positions that control everything are occupied by politicians in the age bracket most opposed to legalization. And with Republicans in control, well, they’re more likely to be opposed to legalizaton than Democrats. I mean, Senator Feinstein is 83, coming up on 84 this June 22. What will it take for that crusty old cow to come around to legalization? Polls indicate California has a good chance of legalizing adult recreational. DonE mentioned it’s got something to do with money…yup, just like it says in the Cannabis Now Magazine article at the link at the bottom.

      http://fivethirtyeight.com/features/both-republicans-and-democrats-have-an-age-problem/

      http://uspolitics.about.com/od/politicaljunkies/g/senioritysystem.htm

      http://cannabisnowmagazine.com/current-events/politics/why-dianne-feinstein-opposes-marijuana-legalization

    6. Todd says:

      If we want to win California, please listen up. The only thing that can go wrong with the AUMA ballot initiative is what happened in Ohio, pro-legalization fools who think that they were hurting the wealthiest 1% by voting no. It is the potential yes voters voting no that should be of concern. The campaign should be about how the new law wouldn’t be worse than now, doesn’t adversely affect medical users (correct me if that is not true), limit our rights as Americans, and such seemingly obvious advantages of legalization over today’s black market.

      • James says:

        The reason it failed in Ohio is it would have given the growing to a select few. Not just anyone. It would have set up a monopoly. Had no bearing on saying F-U to the top 1% earners. So cudos to Ohio for not going down that road.

    7. TheOracle says:

      @Mark, mexweed, if the term recreational use is relegated what replaces it? Social use? Adult use? Relaxation use? Enjoyment? In Dutch it would be referred to as a means of enjoyment: genotmiddel. The connotation is that it is something adults are allowed to do and minors are not. I’m just not so sure that “means of enjoyment” will catch on.

    8. Julian says:

      Anybody following this lawsuit?

      http://www.theweedblog.com/today-worlds-largest-medical-cannabis-dispensary-to-battle-feds-in-tax-court/

      Could the case of the IRS 280E treating dispensaries as illegal drug trafficking operations stop the state legalized cannabis industry on the cusp of a majority of states about to legalize medical marijuana?

    9. Julian says:

      Here’s another propaganda ball for you to bat at Paul;

      http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/310821.php

      The “journal of Human Brain Mapping”?

      The “Filbey Doctors”?

      If by “disrupting the mesocorticolimbic reward system,” they mean turning PTSDisorder into PTSGROWTH or disrupting the cycle of self pity and painful, morbid perspective brought on by depression, than I would be on board, but calling marijuana “addictive” somehow makes me feel that the drug-treatment-vultures are behind this one.

      • mexweed says:

        Re “addictive”, I suspect they keep overlooking an unwelcome obviousness: carbon monoxide (as in $moking, we can Vape instead) is addictive, because it delivers temporary (all they want at the moment) relief from ANXIETY, the one thing the $mokers really most want relief from!! and they will tolerate any side effects from bad remedies that they use against anxiety.

        “Depression” itself is a preferred but treacherous hedge or remedy against anxiety. Depression involves a systemwide Shutdown, trillions of cells partly disabling their perception and response systems in order to kill off unwanted awarenesses and involvements in anything they are anxious about. Playing cool (dead) as jargon has it. Mellow out, relax etc.

        Everyone is scared of anxiety, that “4 of 4 itself”. In modern times a trend has emerged to single out SAD Social Anxiety Disorder as a cause of (or excuse for) (psycho-self-inflicted) depression. Base of the anxiety: you don’t want Bullies B, C, D et all. to see you helplessly flinch at some trumpery a Bully A has hurled at you, downward slope to eternal social hell where they ALL pick on you. Some social anxiety is justified, disorder sets in with the false remedies, such as “learn to ignore it” and the “ignore it” reflex which cancerates out spreading to all parts of your being– at which point “depression” is diagnosed.

        Example: typical $quare victim holds, puffs on, disposes of their $igarette in a series of stock gestures connoting diffidence, thoughtlessness, indifference– intended to bore Bully A so he passes on and picks on someone else. (Besides the monoxide sidesmoke makes the thing resemble a gun.) In some environments, anything that can help a kid “fend off” bully terrorism is attractive, addictive.

        • mexweed says:

          PS– relevance to cannabis: legalization and widespread public adoption of appropriate Microtoke serving utensils will quickly prove that CANNABIS CAN CURE DEPRESSION even better than it can cancer– bad news for the oligarchs, because depressives are careless with money (in manic My Money shopping binge outbursts) and buy lots of $igarettes, Alcohol, $auerbraten and Lottery Tickets.

          • Julian says:

            Mexweed, I have to disagree with you one one point; smoking marijuana is not addictive. As another post here says, “When I run out of weed, I don’t panic,” or something to that extent. No one steals money, or begins withdrawing in pain or robs a liquor store because they run out of weed to smoke or vaporize or ingest through whatever orafice they choose to consume marijuana of any strain or variety.
            As we watch the Ohio legislature skip ahead of the voter initiative to pass a vaporize-only quasi-prohibition of smoke like Pennsylvania did, it is clear that our opponents have switched tactics to attack the smoking of marijuana, as if that somehow still justifies disproportionate incarceration or the denial of more immediate ways of seeking relief. (Let me see… I’m puking my brains out from the chemotherapy, should I light this bowl up here in the hospital and stop an early, horrifying and untimely death and risk fines or arrest or should I wade through my own vomit and pray someone here knows how to mash this herb down into a concentrate I can legally vaporize?)

            • Julian says:

              I realize vaporizing is healthier than smoking marijuana. But smoking marijuana at my poker game tonight does not harm anyone getting a contact high, and I can always go outside and take a piss if anyone wants to be a pussy about it (present company excluded, no offense).
              The point is, smoking marijuana doesn’t harm anyone, it is certainly not addictive in the way that chocolate or smartphones are, and we need to be very careful about how we convey smoking in comparison to vaporization of marijuana because pharmaceutical companies are finding ways to capitalize on this misconception in Pennsylvania and now Ohio. 100 million years of coevolution with our ancestors inhaling the smoke of cannabis can’t be wrong!
              In fact, the only ancient civilization I’m aware of that vaporized marijuana were the Persians through hookas exemplified by the prophet Zoriaster during 600BC. And judging from the incence that Zoriaster’s descendant wise men gave to baby Jesus, it would appear smoking was not off the menu even for them. If that doesn’t convince you smoking weed was good enough for Jesus, he spent nearly a decade among the scythians who traditionally threw bales of cannabis into ceremonial fires for all to inhale.
              What’s good for one patient or consumer is not always good for another. A pregnant woman may choose to use topical cannabis oils to treat labor pains. Asthma patients should try vaporizing and if you need instant relief from nausea for God’s sake, load a bowl and light it up. But to continue incarcerating, condemning or even tolerating the prohibition of combusted cannabis is the prohibition of our human heritage, and we mustn’t stand for it.

      • Julian says:

        Here’s a good counterstudy just released;

        http://norml.org/news/2016/06/08/study-long-term-cannabis-use-is-not-associated-with-health-problems-in-mid-life

        I started smoking weed at 18 and am now 38 so I concurr with the age group of this study’s findings. :-)

    10. Julian says:

      Good news for Americans thanks to Eugene Monroe, offensive lineman for the Baltimore Ravens coming from the National Football league’s senior vice president for player health and safety;

      http://www.sbnation.com/nfl/2016/6/6/11866256/nfl-medical-marijuana-research-eugene-monroe

      A baby step into considering the research of marijuana on CTE, but a first step in the right direction for America’s favorite sport.

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