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CDC: Changes In State Marijuana Laws Associated With Declining Teen Use

  • by Paul Armentano, NORML Deputy Director June 13, 2016

    no_marijuanaThe passage of statewide laws regulating the consumption of cannabis by adults and/or qualified patients is not associated with increased rates of teen marijuana use, according to a statistical analysis of results from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s 2015 Youth Risk Behavior Survey.

    CDC data reports that the percentage of high-schoolers ever reporting having used cannabis fell from an estimated 43 percent in 1995 to just under 39 percent in 2015. The percentage of teens currently using cannabis (defined as having used marijuana at least once in the past 30 days) also declined during this same period, from 25 percent in 1995 to just under 22 percent in 2015.

    During this time period, two-dozen states enacted statutes permitting qualified patients to consume cannabis, and four states enacted laws permitting the commercial production and retail sale of marijuana to adults.

    The Youth Risk Behavior Survey results are consistent with those of numerous other studies — such as those here, here, here, here, here, here, here, here, here, and here — finding that changes in cannabis’ legal status are not associated with increased use among adolescents.

    9 Responses to “CDC: Changes In State Marijuana Laws Associated With Declining Teen Use”

    1. mexweed says:

      Didn’t have time to check out all those studies, but are they taking into account the ongrowth of THC-metabolite-“Drug”-Tests as a terrorist method of scaring kids away from ever having a toke more recently than a month ago? One failed Test and you’re ineligible, blacklisted, disowned, evicted for life.

    2. Mark Mitcham says:

      I swear to God, I’m just not that worried about teenagers smoking marijuana. Unless there is some other reason to be concerned, it’s a non-issue for me. It’s what teenagers do, remember? It’s probably the safest thing your goddamn teenagers will do all day tomorrow! (Not sure who I’m ranting at here, certainly not NORML; I’m just advocating for the teens: let’s lighten up on them, it’s not the end of the world, if they did smoke some, now is it?)

    3. Galileo Galilei says:

      …”results are consistent with those of numerous other studies — such as those here, here, here, here, here, here, here, here, here, and here”…

      Reproducible results! Eureka! Now we’re getting somewhere.

    4. Julian says:

      Here! Hear! … And here, and, here, here, here and here, infinity +1! :-)

      …Even says the pharmaceutically challenged CDC… Even they can see beyond their corporately facilitated opiate stupor and guarantee that legalizing marijuana decreases teen marijuana use… No more black market profit over legal risk factor to contend with; what a surprise.

      And yet when I google “marijuana news today,” into my i-phone’s pre-programmed search engine, I get contradicting propaganda from RAND;

      http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/310952.php

      As if RAND studies arent politically motivated to distort facts and science… I think RAND stands for “Retro-Actives in Nonscientific Drug Denial.”

      • Mark Mitcham says:

        I took a look at the link, and it’s the same old shit — the old guilt-by-association con game. All throughout it, it’s “marijuana AND alcohol” this, and “marijuana AND alcohol” that.

        Been listening to this shit forever. Every rape, murder, theft or assault reported in the media apparently has to go through this same con-game filter: “The perp had marijuana in his system.” Or, “The perp was drug tested, but no drugs (read “marijuana”) or alcohol was found.”

        Same with the high school kids: “Kids with poor grades were found to have used marijuana recently.” But so what? Kids with fantastic grades also smoked it recently. Load of shit. If they had something statistically meaningful, they would be out with it, they wouldn’t be using scientifically meaningless political terms like “drugs and alcohol” (a phrase with implies a distinction that does not exist.) It’s deceptive and immoral.

        • Don M says:

          The smartest kid in my high school was also used marijuana daily! Last I heard about this kid is that he is now a distinguished mathematician. As for me, I have used it since I was a teen and went on to serve in the USMC and worked in computer programming and electronics.

          Of course there are stupid kids that will use it but it does not make them stupid; or lazy, or want to kill!

          Ignoring science is stupid! I say that for 2 people who recently stated that marijuana makes people stupid and they are: Nancy Grace and Mitt Romney.

    5. Dusty says:

      Alcohol is so much more dangerous to the human body than exogenous cannabinoids. As is tobacco. Its time to fit public policy to science, not rummors, myths and prejudice.

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