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NORML’s Legislative Round Up July 15th, 2016

  • by Danielle Keane, NORML Political Director July 15, 2016

    US_capitolMembers of Congress this week heard testimony on the state of marijuana research, and leading members of the U.S. Senate introduced legislation to potentially reclassify CBD. A medical marijuana initiative in Montana qualified for the November ballot and Governors in three states signed marijuana related bills into law. Keep reading below to get this week’s latest marijuana news and to find out how you can #TakeAction.

    Federal:
    On Wednesday, members of the U.S. Senate Judiciary Subcommittee on Crime and Terrorism, chaired by Senator Lindsey Graham (R-SC) held a hearing titled, “Researching Marijuana’s Potential Medical Benefits and Risks”. Testimony was provided by Senators Kirsten Gillibrand (D-NY) and Cory Booker (D-NJ), who are co-sponsors of the CARERS Act, as well as by officials from the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA) and the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). While several witnesses were asked by the committee whether or not they expected the DEA to reschedule cannabis, none provided a direct answer. An archive of the hearing is available online here.

    Today, US Senators Charles Grassley (R-IA), Diane Feinstein (D-CA), Pat Leahy (D-VT), and Thom Tillis (R-NC) introduced legislation, the “Cannabidiol Research Expansion Act.” The Act requires the Attorney General to make a determination as to whether cannabidiol should be reclassified under the Controlled Substances Act and would expand research on the potential medical benefits of cannabidiol and other marijuana components. You can voice your support for this measure, as well as other pending federal legislation, by clicking here.

    State:

    Hawaii: On Tuesday, Governor David Ige signed legislation, House Bill 2707, to expand the state’s medical cannabis program.

    The measure expands the pool of practitioners who may legally recommend cannabis therapy to include advanced nurse practitioners. Separate provisions in the bill remove the prohibition on Sunday dispensary sales and on the possession of marijuana-related paraphernalia by qualified patients. Other language in the bill permits the transportation of medical marijuana across islands for the purposes of laboratory testing, but maintains existing prohibitions banning individual patients from engaging in inter-island travel with their medicine.

    Full text of the bill is available here.

    Missouri: Governor Jay Nixon signed legislation into law today making it easier for those with past marijuana convictions to have their records expunged.

    The legislative measure expands the number of offenses eligible for expungement from roughly a half dozen to more than 100 non-violent and non-sexual crimes. It also allows people to expunge their records sooner, shortening the waiting period to three years for misdemeanors and to seven years following a felony offense. However, the law does not take effect until January 1, 2018.

    Missouri’s NORML coordinator Dan Viets said, “This law will allow many thousands of people who have a marijuana conviction on their public records to escape the lifelong disabilities such a conviction has caused in the past.”

    For more information, contact Missouri NORML here.

    pills_v_potMontana: On Wednesday, a statewide initiative to expand and restore the state’s medical marijuana program qualified for the November ballot. The initiative is seeking to reverse several amendments to the program that were initially passed by lawmakers in 2011.

    If approved by voters, I-182 allows a single treating physician to certify medical marijuana for a patient diagnosed with chronic pain and includes post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) as a “debilitating medical condition” for which a physician may certify medical marijuana, among other changes. You can read the initiative language here.

    Pennsylvania: On Monday, legislation to establish “a pilot program to study the growth, cultivation or marketing of industrial hemp” was sent to Governor Wolf for his signature.

    This measures allows state-approved applicants to research and cultivate industrial hemp as part of an authorized pilot program. This proposal is compliant with Section 7606 of the omnibus federal farm bill, authorizing states to sponsor hemp cultivation pilot programs absent federal reclassification of the plant. More than two dozen states have enacted similar legislation permitting licensed hemp cultivation in a manner that is compliant with this statute. #TakeAction

    Rhode Island: Governor Gina Raimondo signed legislation, House Bill 7142, this week to make post-traumatic stress patients eligible for medical cannabis treatment and to accelerate access to those patients in hospice care. Members of both chambers previously overwhelmingly approved the measure. Full text of the bill is available here. The new law went into effect immediately upon the Governor’s signature.

    2 Responses to “NORML’s Legislative Round Up July 15th, 2016”

    1. Mark Mitcham says:

      It’s hard to know what to make of the introduction of the “Cannabidiol Research Expansion Act.”

      At a first assessment, The legislation would appear to be a baby-step forward — a dipping of the toe into the water, so to speak, regarding the exploration of the medical benefits of cannabis.

      But hold on — they didn’t say “cannabis”, they said “CBD”. That’s the first red flag. That’s awfully precise technical terminology. Maybe too precise! It suggests a hostility toward THC, and by extention, cannabis itself and cannabis legalization.

      Of course, CBD comes from cannabis, and so does THC, and an entire pallet of molecular variations on the theme. And so it would be easy to interpret this as a thawing of the ice, politically — a slight warming up to legalization.

      But I’m not so sure. I took a look at the sponsors, and their NORML scorecard grades:
      Diane Feinstein (D-CA): D
      Grassley (R-IA): F
      Pat Leahy (D-VT): B
      Thom Tillis (R-NC): D

      And that was my second red flag: the sponsors are predominantly prohibitionists.

      So what’s really going on here? One hypothesis: It’s a corporate ploy to exploit the chemical compounds in cannabis for profit, while simultaneously maintaining prohibition of cannabis — again, also for profit.

      So is it really even a baby-step forward at all? I would say “yes”, despite the misdirection involved, primarily because it may facilitate research, which may yield some medical benefits for some people.

      However, let’s not wait for it to produce results — let’s legalize the entire cannabis plant, at full speed ahead, and leave these prohibitionists assholes (maybe except Leahy) in the dust.

    2. La Buscador says:

      A bag of chips one chip at a time.

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