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ABNORML NEWS

  • by Danielle Keane, NORML Associate February 29, 2016

    FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: February 29, 2016

    Contact:
    Jordan Person
    720.588.3814
    responsibleusedenver@gmail.com
    www.responsibleusedenver.com

    DENVER NORML FILES MARIJUANA SOCIAL USE INITIATIVE for 2016 CITY BALLOT
    Would Legalize Private Marijuana Social Clubs and Special Events Where Marijuana Could be Consumed

    Denver, CO – The Denver Chapter of the National Organization for the Reform of Marijuana Laws (Denver NORML) submitted an initiative today that would legalize marijuana clubs and special events in the city in 2016.

    “Denver residents and visitors alike need places other than private homes to legally and responsibly enjoy legal marijuana with other adults,” said Jordan Person, executive director of Denver NORML.

    “This submission to city council is the first step. We’ll get feedback from the city, finalize the language, then start gathering signatures to put it on the ballot,” Person said. If Denver voters approve this November, private 21+ marijuana social clubs will become legal, as will private 21+ events where marijuana can be lawfully consumed.

    “The city will be able to license and regulate private marijuana clubs and special events to ensure public health and safety,” Person said. “But we want to be sure that the regulations are reasonable and consumer-friendly.”

    Clubs would be stand-alone venues which could not sell or distribute marijuana, and bars, nightclubs and restaurants could not become private marijuana clubs, Jordan said. “We expect there will be a wide range of clubs to serve Denver’s huge and diverse marijuana market,” Jordan said. “What can’t continue is the current situation that leaves so many people frustrated, angry, and tempted to violate the law so they can enjoy a legal product.”

    Since its founding in1970, NORML has been the leading voice for marijuana consumers, and for the end of prohibition that treats otherwise law-abiding marijuana smokers like criminals.

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  • by Danielle Keane, NORML Associate February 23, 2016

    11234921_1633219200279366_5916526035468814558_oNORML PAC is pleased to announce it’s endorsement of Braddock, PA Mayor John Fetterman in his campaign to be elected to the United States Senate representing the state of Pennsylvania.

    Mayor Fetterman has made marijuana law reform an important topic of his campaign. When asked about his position towards eliminating criminal penalties for the responsible use of marijuana by adults his campaign responded, “As a small town mayor of a community of color, Mayor John has seen first hand how the War on Drugs has failed and how it has disproportionately failed people of color. Mayor John’s position is also based on science, and he sees it as incredibly hypocritical that our country regulates the sale of alcohol, a far more dangerous drug, but puts people in jail for marijuana use, a drug which has resulted in zero overdose deaths.”

    In addition to National NORML’s support, Mayor Fetterman has also worked closely with our Pittsburgh NORML chapter to highlight the importance of marijuana law reform in Pennsylvania’s communities. We’re positive he will continue to be an outspoken advocate for responsible marijuana use and will continue to champion it as a candidate for U.S. Senate.

    To learn more about Mayor John Fetterman’s campaign for Senate you can visit his website or follow him on Facebook.

     

  • by Danielle Keane, NORML Associate February 3, 2016

    lobby_day_2016NORML’s 2016 Congressional Lobby Day at the United States Capitol is scheduled for May 23rd and 24th. Hundreds of marijuana consumers, activists, patients and business owners are expected to attend a day-long training and informational conference on Monday and re-convene on The Hill Tuesday to personally lobby their elected members of the House of Representatives and Senate.

    Whether you’re a longtime activist, young college student, medical marijuana patient or simply just a marijuana consumer and NORML supporter, consider taking the next step and travelling to Washington D.C. to directly lobby Congress in support of common sense marijuana law reform. You’ll meet like minded activists from across the country and you’ll get a glimpse into the Capitol Hill lawmaking process!

    Scheduling and registration information will soon be posted to norml.org, and promoted as well across NORML’s network via listservs, Facebook, Twitter, etc. Please save the dates and participate in this historic lobbying effort in our nation’s capital at this crucial time in the law reform effort as cannabis prohibition increasingly gives way to legalization!

    For planning purposes you can look up hotel information. Our day-long training and informational conference on Monday will be held at 1957 E Street if you wish to look for something close to the planned activities. Last year, participants also benefited from booking with AirBnb.

     

  • by Danielle Keane, NORML Associate August 7, 2015

    voteThe National Conference of State Legislatures passed a resolution yesterday urging the federal government to amend the Controlled Substances Act and to refrain from interfering with state laws permitting the legal production and use of cannabis.

    The National Conference of State Legislatures is a bipartisan, non-governmental organization founded in 1975 to unite members of legislature’s from around the United States. The council works to improve the quality and effectiveness of state legislatures, promote innovative policy and communication among state legislatures, and to magnify their voice in the federal system.

    The NCSL resolves “[S]tates and localities should be able to set whatever marijuana and hemp policies work best to improve the public safety, health, and economic development of their communities.” Members passed the resolution overwhelmingly by a voice vote.

    The vote represents a strong consensus among state lawmakers that the federal government should embrace, not impede the progress states have made to amend their marijuana laws, and encourages federal lawmakers to consider rescheduling marijuana in order for states to safely and effectively move forward in their reforms.

    Currently 23 states and the District of Columbia have medical marijuana laws on the books, and half of all US states recognize industrial hemp. Four states plus Washington D.C. have legalized marijuana for recreational use.  There is no doubt states have recognized the failed efforts of marijuana prohibition and are eager to try out other policies. NORML commends the resolution adopted by the National Conference of State Legislatures and will continue to advocate for the federal government’s compliance.

  • by Danielle Keane, NORML Associate August 6, 2015

    marijuana_gavelAs first reported by Marijuana.com, a Justice Department internal memo distributed to U.S. House Representatives last year misinformed members on the scope of a medical marijuana amendment they were voting on.

    Last year, lawmakers approved 219 to 189 an amendment aimed at prohibiting the Department of Justice from using funds to interfere with the implementation of state medical marijuana laws.

    We have now learned that in the days before this vote, Justice Department officials distributed “informal talking points” incorrectly warning members that the amendment could “in effect, limit or possibly eliminate the Department’s ability to enforce federal law in recreational marijuana cases as well.” The realization came from a footnote contained in the memo stating that the talking points previously released were, “intended to discourage the passage of the rider but does not reflect our current thinking.”

    The talking points seemed to have an effect on several members, who prior to the final vote on the amendment, argued against it claiming the “amendment as written would tie the DEA’s hands beyond medical marijuana.” Representative Andy Harris (R-MD) went on to claim, “The problem is that the way the amendment is drafted, in a state like Maryland which has medical marijuana, if we ever legalized it, the amendment would stop the DEA from going after more than medical marijuana.”

    These statements coupled with the rest of the long debate that took place before the amendment, clearly signal that lawmakers on both sides of the argument believed the amendment to prohibit federal interference in states with medical marijuana.

    However, in a very narrow interpretation of the amendment, the Justice Department memo claims that the restriction of federal funds for the use of interfering in state-sanctioned medical marijuana programs is strictly for states and state officials implementing the laws themselves. That is to say, the federal government would still be allowed to arrest and prosecute people who grow marijuana and operate dispensaries but the state officials issuing the licenses are protected from federal intrusion. This explains the continued action taken by the federal government against individuals in states with legal medical marijuana laws on the books.

    The same amendment protecting medical marijuana states from federal intervention was passed again this year with a larger margin of support, 242-186.

    Representatives Rohrabacher (R-CA) and Farr (D-CA) (sponsors of the medical marijuana amendment) requested last week the Department of Justice’s inspector general hold an internal investigation into the continued action taken by the federal government. They feel Congress has made it clear by passing the amendment two years in a row, federal funds should no longer be used to prosecute individuals acting in compliance with their state laws.

    Currently 23 states and the District of Columbia have passed medical marijuana laws. Check out our State Info page to check on your state’s current marijuana laws.

     

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