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EDUCATION

  • by Sabrina Fendrick December 5, 2013

    On December 5th 1933 at exactly 5:32pm eastern standard time, Utah signed on as the last of the 36 states needed to ratify the 21st amendment, repealing the nation’s failed 13-year prohibition policy experiment banning the sale and use of alcohol nationwide.  At 6:55 p.m., President Roosevelt signed an official proclamation announcing the nation’s new alcohol policy.

    It was clear to the public, and politicians of the day that alcohol prohibition had failed in everything it was trying to achieve.  The 18th amendment led to widespread disrespect for the law, black market violence, serious loss of tax revenue, and a drain on police resources.

    ProhibitionRepealNYT

    Here we are again, eighty years later fighting another, equally damaging policy of marijuana prohibition.  Unlike the short lived 18th amendment however, our nation’s punitive and disastrous marijuana laws have been in effect for more than 75 years.  The longevity of this current prohibition has resulted in exponentially more damage to our society than that caused by the alcohol laws of the 1920’s and early 30’s.  Today’s laws have ruined millions of lives and wasted hundreds of billions of taxpayer dollars.  It has fueled the black market, contributes to the erosion of civil liberties and continues to line the pockets of criminals and cartels.

    Eighty years ago today, our President and 36 states came to the same conclusion: That making something a majority of people perceive as harmless and fun illegal will not make it go away, or solve any problems perceived to be associated with its use.  It is about managing public safety by containing the market and managing the user experience.  The majority of alcohol drinkers and marijuana users are responsible people who consume in moderation.  It is time for our lawmakers to recognize what their predecessors did so many years ago, legalization and regulation is the only sensible solution.  Colorado and Washington are pioneering a new policy allowing for the legal, taxable sale of marijuana to adults 21+, and it is only a matter of time before more states follow suit.  Through an environment of control, standardization and accountability, both for the individual and the industry, our nation can begin to undo the generations of damage brought on by marijuana prohibition.

    The days of marijuana prohibition are numbered and one day, marijuana will take its rightful place alongside alcohol as a legal recreational alternative.  One day, we too will be celebrating our very own day of repeal.

  • by Allen St. Pierre, NORML Executive Director November 5, 2013

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    One’s eyes rarely lie or distort reality. So when walking by my favorite newspaper stand in downtown Washington, D.C. last night another clear political tea leaf revealed itself about the increasing acceptance in America for ending cannabis prohibition when I spied the competing covers for the most recent editions of The Nation and Reason Magazine.

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    Both magazines are populated with interesting and though-provoking pieces about ending cannabis prohibition, the coming commerce in cannabis post-prohibition and ‘liberal guilt’ for supporting the war on some drugs.

     

  • by Sabrina Fendrick October 24, 2013

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    It’s no secret that there has been a proliferation government agencies across the country removing minors and infants from their home, based solely on the fact that a parent is a cannabis consumer, and the false presumption that the presence of marijuana poses a danger.  This even occurs in states with a legal medical marijuana program, or where marijuana possession is no longer a criminal offense.  Some of these experiences can be incredibly traumatic to the child, as well as the parents, as officers have a tendency to use aggressive and sometimes militaristic tactics while engaging with these families.

    FLCAlogo_innerbottomtxt_smallNORML receives dozens of calls and emails every month from devastated parents who have lost custody of their children to state agencies, and we remain committed to providing support and resources to those forced into these unfortunate circumstances.  In light of such efforts, we are pleased to announce that NORML has recently partnered with the newly formed Family Law and Cannabis Alliance (FLCA), founded by longtime drug reform activists Jess Cochrane and Sara Arnold.  The FLCA is an informational clearinghouse that provides educational resources, advocacy information and legal referrals geared  toward reformers & affected families on the crossover of marijuana laws & the child protection system.

    Sabrina Fendrick, Director of Women’s Outreach said, she is “looking forward to working with the Family Law and Cannabis Alliance to raise awareness about the devastating effects, and sometimes dangerous practice, of child services in removing children from their safe and loving homes for the mere fact a parent is a cannabis consumer.  It is time to end this destructive policy, and put an end to marijuana prohibition once and for all.”

    Click here for more information on the Family Law and Cannabis Alliance.

  • by Sabrina Fendrick October 10, 2013

    [UPDATE: October 30, the family of the young man entrapped by police in this case have filed a lawsuit. Read more here.]

    In late 2012, a Riverside County, California police officer infiltrated a local high school, befriended a vulnerable, special needs student and then proceeded to send more than 60 text messages begging the student to buy him weed.  The student, who had been diagnosed with autism as well as bipolar disorder, Tourettes, and several anxiety disorders (and noticeably handicapped) became overwhelmed by the pressure, and the desire to keep his only friend.  He finally agreed to buy pot for “Dan” (the undercover cop).  It took the teenager weeks to find anything, eventually buying half of a joint from from a homeless man downtown.

    Then, as reported by Reason Magazine, “On December 11, 2012 armed police officers walked into [the student’s] classroom and arrested him in front of his peers. He was taken to the juvenile detention center, along with the 21 other arrestees, where he was kept for 48 hours. First hand reports claim that the juvenile center was caught off guard by the large number of arrests and that some youths had to sleep on the floor, using toilet paper as pillows.”  The child was also expelled from school.

    This story is a grotesque example of how our nation’s marijuana policies continue to encourage the use of barbaric and predatory tactics by law enforcement officials.  They are financially incentivised to not only target otherwise law abiding citizens, but actively work to manipulate innocent children.  Aside from the gross misappropriation of limited police resources, this incident clearly highlights many of the tragic implications marijuana prohibition continues to have on our nation’s youth.  Further, zero tolerance policies in schools have proven to be ineffective in the very purpose for which they were originally designed. The practice of engaging in high school undercover drug stings has proven to do nothing to curb teen drug use.  It does however, leave the student body traumatized and resentful of law enforcement, making them less likely to report legitimate crimes in the future.  It is an egregiously unfair and punitive practice by educational institutions to expel students as punishment for any infraction of a rule, a significant portion of which are for non-violent low level drug violations.  How does removing a minor from what is intended to be a stable, nurturing environment do anything to help prepare these individuals to lead responsible productive lives?  They are now forced to sit at home with nothing to do but hang out with other expelled peers, or in a juvenile detention center.

    One can argue that this all leads back to the financial incentives driving police officers to arrest as many individuals on drug charges as possible.  Every year, law enforcement jurisdictions are given federal grants, swat gear, overtime pay and assets based solely on their number of drug arrests.  Perhaps it is a result of former Governor Schwarzenegger’s passage of SB 1449 in 2010, which reduced the crime of possession of an ounce of pot from a misdemeanor to an infraction for adults 18 and over.  Now, the only way to keep up their arrest rates is by targeting minors – whose charges remain misdemeanors.  It is time to stop the madness and put an end to these insane zero-tolerance policies.  Our children’s future depends on it.

    **The family of the student framed by an undercover officer have set up a fundraiser to support their lawsuit against the school district.  Click here for more information.

  • by Sabrina Fendrick September 20, 2013

    OK NORML

    Oklahoma, City, OK:  A majority of likely Oklahoma voters back legalizing the use of medical marijuana and also support de-penalizing pot possession penalties for recreational users, according to survey data released by SoonerPoll.com and commissioned by the Oklahoma state affiliate of the National Organization for the Reform of Marijuana Laws (NORML).

    Seventy-one percent of respondents said that they support amending state law to allow for physician-authorized patients to consume cannabis for therapeutic purposes. Twenty states and Washington, DC, have enacted similar policies since 1996.

    Oklahoma citizens also strongly backed amending state criminal laws that presently outlaw the plant’s social use.  Fifty-seven percent of respondents said that they preferred treating minor marijuana violations as a non-criminal, fine-only offense.  Violators of such a policy would not be subject to arrest, face jail time, or receive a criminal record.  Sixteen states already impose similar ‘depenalization’ policies.  Two states, Colorado and Washington, have eliminated all criminal and civil penalties surrounding the possession of small quantities of marijuana by adults.

    Finally, over 81 percent of Oklahoma respondents agreed that state lawmakers, not the federal government, ought to be the final arbiters to decide whether “[state] laws regarding whether the use of marijuana [are] legal or not.”

    Over 400 hundred likely voters participated in the statewide scientific poll, which possesses a margin or error of ±4.9 percent.

    Oklahoma’s marijuana penalties are among the most punitive in the county.  Sales of any amount of cannabis are punishable by two years to life in prison.  Subsequent minor marijuana possession offenses are punishable by two to ten years in prison.

    For more information, please contact: http://norml.org/chapters/ok.

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