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EDUCATION

  • by Sabrina Fendrick September 3, 2013

    VA NORML Adopt-a-Highway cropA huge congratulations is due to NORML’s state chapter in the Old Dominion.  Last week, Virginia NORML joined the ranks of the the Kiwanis Club and the Cub Scouts when they posted the first NORML “Adopt-a-Highway” sign in the Commonwealth of Virginia.  And while they didn’t get highway 420 (located in Alexandria), they did get a nice segment in Northern Virginia west of the DC beltway, and just 20 miles north of the Central Intelligence Agency (CIA).  The Northern Virginia regional affiliate, NOVA NORML has organized the first clean up to take place Sunday September 29th, 2013 at 11am.  Volunteers will be meeting near Dulles International Airport, at the corner of Woodland Rd and Severn Way.  We encourage all NOVA supporters to come out and get involved.

    VIRGINIA STATE CONFERENCE:  In addition, Virginia NORML will also be holding a statewide conference on Saturday October 5th near the University of Virginia, in Charlottesville, Va.  It will feature well-known experts in cannabis law and policy, as well as longtime Virginia marijuana activists. Speakers include the associate director of the National Commission on Marihuana and Drug Abuse (1971-73) and secretary of the first National Advisory Council on Drug Abuse (1975-80), Richard Bonnie (professor, University of Virginia), former National NORML executive director Jon Gettman, and current Virginia gubernatorial candidate Robert Sarvis (libertarian).  Conference tickets and additional information available here.

  • by Sabrina Fendrick August 15, 2013
    OC NORML Director

    Kandice Hawes
    OC NORML Director

    NORML is pleased to announce that our 2012 Chapter of the Year Award recipient, Orange County NORML, will be celebrating its 10-year anniversary this Friday.  NORML is very proud, and grateful for the army of volunteers nationwide that remains dedicated to maintaining his or hers chapter’s efforts to raise awareness, and mobilize activists on the ground.  In celebration of Orange County NORML’s 10 year milestone,  founder and executive director Kandice Hawes has agreed to sit down with NORML and shed some light on the secret to her chapter’s longevity, as well as provide some survival tips to other activists.

    1) How long have you been chapter director?
    I founded OC NORML in 2003 and have been the elected Director for 10 years.

    2) What challenges have you faced since taking on that role and how did you overcome them?
    One challenge is balancing work, school and personal life along with the duties of running a NORML chapter. I am lucky to have a great team of volunteers and chapter officers that I am able to delegate tasks to. Just lately we developed a party/fundraising committee, now all of these activities are handled by a group of members instead of myself.  Another challenge is the number of emails and communications that I receive. I try to work a little every day to keep up. It seems that the longer I run the chapter the more the monthly duties become part of my natural life and are easy to fit into my schedule.

    3) Has your advocacy affected your personal life?
    Being an activist has affected my life in a positive way. One of the bonuses from running a NORML chapter is that I get the chance to meet amazing people and grow wonderful friendships. Besides the connections and friendships activism has helped me to improve my personal skills and public speaking capabilities.

    4) What is the secret to your chapter’s longevity?
    Great volunteers and members are the secret to our chapter’s longevity. If you have the opportunity to work with great people who eventually become friends then every activity is enjoyable and people will be willing to get together to get things done.

    5) What is your secret to successful fundraising?
    We raise at least $10,000 a year and all of these donations are of $20 or less. We believe that the best way to fund raise is to give people something for their money. We don’t ask for straight cash donations but use parties and trading goods for donations to raise money. We have also found that 420 BINGO games are cheap and great money makers.

    6) You are one of the few NORML chapters to be recognized by the IRS as a 501(c)3 tax-deductible nonprofit.  What was that process like and how long did it take?
    I applied for the OC NORML non profit tax status 10 years ago and I remember that it was a challenge, but piece by piece I was able to complete the necessary forms with both the federal and state government. The whole process took me a couple of months, but nowadays you can pay legal services to file forms and save the frustration. One frustration is that our chapter filed as a non profit educational organization and before we were approved I had to prove we weren’t distributing propaganda and submit copies of educational information we would be distributing.

    7) What about your chapter are you most proud of?
    I am most proud of the life changing friendships our members have built. It also makes me proud when the chapter functions without me and I know it will survive long after I do.

    8) Has being a woman director helped or hurt (or had any effect at all) on your work?
    I believe that being a woman has helped me to be an effective leader. As a woman I think I am compassionate and am always concerned about members feeling well and fitting in.

     9) What areas of your chapter would you like to improve?
    We are currently working on improving our web site and making online membership signup and shopping available.

     10) What advice would you give to other chapter leaders who aspire to the success of your chapter?
    Make the meetings fun and have a purpose for each one, have the attendees learn something new every time. Make your group the kind of group of people that others want to belong to. Teach your members skills at meetings like public speaking that will help you be a more effective group in professional settings. And lastly, try to be organized, outgoing and understanding.

     

    Orange County NORML will be hosting a “10 Year Smokin’ Anniversary” celebration this Saturday, August 17 at Giovanni’s Pizza in Fullerton.

    Giovanni’s Pizza
    922 Williamson Avenue
    Fullerton, CA 92832

    (714) 738-4600

    RSVP on Facebook here

  • by Allen St. Pierre, NORML Executive Director August 12, 2013

    In a country where it is increasingly difficult to find a living and breathing person willing to publicly debate in favor of maintaining cannabis prohibition’s status quo, one newly formed anti-marijuana organization and it’s primary spokesperson rightly lands in the crosshairs of medical researcher and cannabis policy reform activist Sunil Kumar Aggarwal, M.D. for conducting (from the time he was a college student-through his work at the Office of National Drug Control Policy-to now forming an anti-cannabis non-profit created to try to stem the ever-growing tide of public opinion in favor of legally controlling cannabis with regulations and taxation–not the brute force of the racially disparate, expensive and wasteful criminal justice system) a systematic and intellectually dishonest public relations campaign against cannabis.

    The newly formed anti-marijuana legalization group, Smart Approaches To Marijuana SAM (which appears to be an organ of big anti-tobacco concerns, with funding from insurance companies and community health trust funds) and it’s spokesperson Kevin Sabet get some white hot and antiseptic light cast in their direction at Alternet from a long vexed Dr. Aggarwal.

    Supplemental material about Kevin Sabet, notably his years attending University of California at Berkeley, is also published by The Center for Cannabis and Social Policy.

  • by Allen St. Pierre, NORML Executive Director August 10, 2013

    (CNN) – Despite decades of propaganda from marijuana prohibitionists, a majority of the American public has indeed said “enough” to the policies of cannabis criminalization. And no amount of fear-mongering is going to change this fact.

    Writing in a just-published report by the Brookings Institute, “The New Politics of Legalization,” authors E.J. Dionne and William Galston conclude, “In less than a decade, public opinion has shifted dramatically toward support for the legalization of marijuana. … Demographic change and widespread public experience using marijuana imply that opposition to legalization will never again return to the levels seen in the 1980s. The strong consensus that formed the foundation for many of today’s stringent marijuana laws has crumbled.”

    Read the rest of the essay here.

     

     

  • by Allen St. Pierre, NORML Executive Director August 7, 2013

    Washington, DC: I jumped into a cab Monday afternoon at the airport at the top of the hour, when the all-news radio station led with an almost hysterical-in-tone news flash of the Washington Post being sold to Amazon’s Jeff Bezos. While most of established Washington and media circles rightly buzz about this cataclysmic change in ownership…my mind has raced for nearly 48 hours thinking back to the PROFOUND influence the Washington Post has had in in maintaining cannabis prohibition—acting at times barely more than a government organ; a ‘rip-n-read’ anti-pot propaganda machine.

    Call it professional pique, intellectual disgust or adopted hometown embarrassment after twenty-three years of reading Washington, DC’s ‘paper of record’ and the nation’s “premiere” political digests in regards to most everything having to do with cannabis:

    Activism (one time the Washington Post compared 10,000 cannabis activists gathered in DC to protest prohibition laws to UFO enthusiasts…instead of listening to concerned citizens about a failed government policy like cannabis prohibition, the ‘activists’ The Post has largely focused on are faux activists that work for government agencies or their chosen grant recipients; CADCA, CASA, PDFA, PRIDE (which is now NFIA) and DARE*)

    Science (The Post has almost exclusively relied upon federal anti-drug agencies like NIDA, SAMHSA and IOM for its cannabis-related information, who’re as bias against cannabis as NORML is for the herb)

    Culture (movies, TV shows, songs, books, magazines, musical and comedic acts who dabbled in cannabis-related theming were generally panned and mocked as being culturally irrelevant)

    Politics (pre-Marcus Brauchli, The Post’s editor from 2008-2012, the paper’s coverage of local, state, federal and international was decidedly statist and prohibitionist)

    Economics (despite near ubiquity of opinion within economic circles that cannabis prohibition is an economic failure, The Post historically cast economists who identify such obvious failings as ‘libertarian’, as if this were a pejorative)

    Race (skewed through the prism of upper-middle class African American editors and columnists from early 1980s until more recent years with their retirements, many of whom reached national prominence [Carl Rowan, Bill Raspberry and Colby King immediately come to mind], The Post cast cannabis as the precursor to most all things bad in the DC black community from heroin use in the 1970s, to cocaine in the 80s, to crack in the early 90s, to ecstasy in the late 90s….to gun violence, gang banging, teen pregnancy, underperforming schools, rap music, high rates of arrest and incarceration and broken families. So wanton to cast this narrative, The Post first won and then had to give back a Pulitzer prize for a writer making up a drug-addicted young boy in a totally fabricated narrative)

    Opinion-making (from about 1977-2008 the Washington Post’s editorial board and the widely read ‘commentary’ section was mainstream media central’s feeding trough for some of the most institutionalized Reefer Madness imaginable. A steady diet of mindless, fact-challenged and intellectually dishonest op-eds could be counted on bi-weekly from wild-eyed anti-cannabis professionals like Joseph Califano, William Bennett, John Walters, Peter Bensinger, Robert DuPont and whoever the ‘drug czar’ du jour. Conversely, one of the most prolific and syndicated columnists of the last forty years, William F. Buckley, The Post rarely ran any one of the dozens of pro-cannabis law reform columns he penned, often critical of the men mentioned above for their words and deeds vis-à-vis their continued support for cannabis prohibition, but for no sane, logical reasons or well reasoned reasons. In the early 1990s NORML director Richard Cowan contacted then managing editor Robert Kaiser, a classmate of his from Yale, imploring the two men to meet and discuss The Post’s news and editorial coverage of cannabis. Mr. Kaiser, while responsive to the letters, was not at all inclined to meet with a group like NORML and didn’t think anything wrong with The Post’s coverage and choice of ‘experts’ to broadcast to the reading audience…)

    *Conduit of government (…to Mr. Kaiser’s insistence to Mr. Cowan that The Post was objective re cannabis, it was not long after that I came to understand how bias The Post, under the Graham family, was to cannabis when they employed a respected essayist who leans libertarian in his writings named James Bovard to write a profile in 1994 on what was then the controversial DARE program, and more specifically on children who were encouraged and even taught by visiting DARE officers on how to turn their parents in for cannabis and other drug use. Many of these DARE cases were first vetted through NORML and forwarded to national and state media outlets, so Mr. Bovard had plenty of material fodder to cull through for his Post piece.

    Apparently troubled by the tone and light cast on the DARE program in Mr. Bovard’s well written and compelling guest column, Post editors and lawyers intervened three days before publication without informing Bovard, sent the story to DARE lawyers to review, the column was then substantively edited and items added by Post editors that were not from Bovard’s original reportage, amazingly, some of the information was libelous in the minds of a family in Georgia mentioned, who filed a lawsuit against The Post.

    I called the Washington Post and spoke to the legal counsel about the Post’s actions, and she informed me when I inquired with her whether or not from that point forward as a daily Washington Post reader should I believe that the words written by a columnist/guest writer are in fact their own, her reply was, in effect, ‘they might write them, but we print them, so, the answer to your question is “no”’. Believing her, from that point forward, I have never read The Post fully confident at all that I’m reading the writers’ work more than the viewpoints of the editors and owners.

    Indeed, on the rare occasion, probably to lend to the appearance of being balanced, The Post would publish a pro-reform essay from Drug Policy Alliance’s Ethan Nadelmann, Harvard’s Lester Grinspoon or ACLU’s Ira Glasser; or their less read ‘Foreign’ section would occasionally publish a field report from a Post reporter about what they were witnessing in Amsterdam, for example.)

    The big question:Does having an all-controlling family who largely hire statist editors and lawyers, with a former District of Columbia police officer in the ownership ranks, running the national capital’s major newspaper ceding the sale of the property to an apparently libertarian-leaning west coast, high tech billionaire located in a pro-cannabis city, in a state where the citizens have propelled the state to the vanguard of ending cannabis prohibition by voting last year to legalize the possession and sale of cannabis for adults have a MAJOR impact on the future and rapidity of cannabis law reforms in America—but maybe most importantly on Washington, D.C. and the federal government that created cannabis prohibition in 1937, has maintained it viciously and without remorse, ultimately the entity that can best end this nearly seventy-five year public policy, free market debacle?

    The big answer: I dunno.

    But, wow, I sure hope so.

    Really, think about it. Amazon is the most innovative and largest retailer in the world. When cannabis prohibition ends, and technology securely and safely delivers adult commerce directly to the consumer, what other company (and their much smaller product providers) better stands to benefit from the billions of dollars annually from cannabis moving from being illegal to legal commerce? Who? Costco?? Starbucks? Hmmm…they’re also Washington State-based companies.

    Of the many hundreds of thousands of items in NORML’s large archives about the history of cannabis prohibition, the day the Washington Post was sold from the Graham family to Jeffrey Bezos may indicate major epoch change in America’s intellectual and business society from one of enthusiastically embracing cannabis prohibition to possibly challenging its continued existence to profiting from the needed change in policy.

    Talk about doing well at the same time as good! Something tells me that one day I’ll look forward to morning read of my Bezos-owned Washington Post–questioning failed government policies rather than being a lapdog for them–and probably enjoying some home-delivered Amazon cannabis too.

     

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