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  • by Keith Stroup, NORML Legal Counsel April 19, 2016

    Barry Grissom

    We are pleased to announce that Barry Grissom, who until last Friday was the US Attorney for Kansas, will be speaking at the 2016 NORML Aspen Legal Seminar this June in Aspen, CO. The seminar is scheduled for June 2, 3 and 4, 2016.

    We have had many wonderful speakers at our various legal seminars over the years, including many former prosecutors, but I believe this is our first former US Attorney to appear on the program. Barry’s topic, on Friday afternoon, will be The Advantages to Ending Marijuana Prohibition from the Perspective of a US Attorney.

    If you are a practicing attorney and are expecting to attend the Aspen legal seminar this year, please register soon so we know which states we need to apply for CLE approval. This seminar is also open to non-lawyers.

    We have a great program again this year with outstanding speakers, including some new faces, and fascinating topics dealing with cutting edge issues facing criminal defense and marijuana business lawyers today. Whether you are from a state still looking forward to an end to marijuana prohibition, or from one of the states that have begun to experiment with different legalization models, you will leave this seminar with the knowledge that you are current both with the law and the politics of marijuana legalization in America.

    And, of course, we guarantee everyone a lively social calendar as well, including an opening reception at the Gant on Thursday; a benefit dinner at the lovely Aspen home of Chris and Gerry Goldstein (catered by Cache Cache chef Chris Lanter) on Friday, and an afternoon cookout with live music at Owl Farm, the guests of Hunter Thompson’s widow, Anita Thompson, on Saturday.

    Please register early and reserve a reduced rate condo at the Gant, using code NORML16. We look forward to seeing you in Aspen in early June.

    NORML Aspen Legal Seminar - Register Now

  • by Danielle Keane, NORML Political Director April 8, 2016

    map_leafWe’ve got several legislative updates from around the country this week. Keep reading below to get the latest in marijuana law reform!

    State:

    Colorado: Denver NORML filed the Responsible Use initiative with the city of Denver. If passed by voters this November, it would legalize the establishment of private marijuana clubs for adults 21 and up. Passage of this ordinance would be a historic first step in moving toward normalizing the responsible, adult consumption of marijuana. The initiative would provide adults with a legally defined space where marijuana could be consumed and shared with other like-minded citizens — a simple, yet necessary accommodation for states that have passed some form of legalization. You can show support for the initiative by liking their page on Facebook.

    Florida: On April 1st, the city of Tampa began implementing its new decriminalization law. Under the new ordinance, people caught with 20 grams or less of marijuana will now only face a civil citation rather than a arrest, criminal prosecution, and a criminal record.

    Also, The Florida Democratic Party has endorsed Amendment 2, a constitutional amendment to permit the physician-authorized use and state-licensed distribution of cannabis for therapeutic purposes. The initiative has also received recent endorsements from the Tallahassee Democrat, the Miami Herald, and the Bradenton Herald. Presently, 16 states explicitly exempt the use of CBD by qualified patients. But, to date, no of these states provide a regulated, in-state supply source for the product.

    Maine: A superior court judge today overturned the Secretary of State’s ruling that a citizen petition seeking to legalize recreational marijuana in Maine was invalid. The ruling mandates the Secretary of State to review the disputed signatures to determine whether petitioners submitted enough valid ones to qualify for ballot placement this November.

    Missouri: This week, regulators at the Missouri Department of Agriculture granted licenses to two applicants seeking to grow CBD-dominant cannabis. Their products are anticipated to be ready for distribution this fall to state-qualified patients.

    Pennsylvania: State lawmakers have unanimously passed separate pieces of legislation to establish “a pilot program to study the growth, cultivation or marketing of industrial hemp.” Members of the Senate voted 49 to zero in March in favor of SB 50. House lawmakers more recently voted 187 to zero in favor of the House companion bill, HB 967. House Bill 967 will now go to the Senate  for concurrence with SB 50 and then to Gov. Tom Wolf, who has expressed support for the legislation. #TakeAction

    Members of the Pittsburgh City Council have approved a new ordinance imposing more lenient penalties for minor marijuana possession offenses. Under this ordinance, marijuana-related offenses will now be classified as summary offenses, punishable by a fine of $100 for public smoking or $25 for the possession of a small amount of marijuana.

    Virginia: Governor Terry McAuliff has signed legislation, Senate Bill 701, into law to establish regulations governing the in-state production of therapeutic oils high in cannabdiol and/or THC-A (THC acid). Senate Bill 701 requires the Board of Pharmacy to adopt regulations establishing health, safety, and security requirements for pharmaceutical processors of oils high in CBD and/or THC-A. The measure takes effect on July 1, 2016.

    Don’t forget to join us in Washington D.C. May 23rd and 24th for our 2016 Congressional Lobby Day! Whether you are a longtime activist, a young college student, a medical marijuana patient, a social marijuana consumer, or just someone who opposes prohibition, this is an opportunity to meet like-minded individuals from across the country and get a glimpse into the Capitol Hill lawmaking process. It is an exhilarating experience for anyone who has taken the time to come to DC to lobby their members of Congress. Get your tickets today!

  • by Kevin Mahmalji, NORML Outreach Coordinator April 1, 2016

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    As Colorado approaches its fourth year of legal marijuana, consumers around the state are still struggling with the issue of acceptance. With local governments passing restrictive laws aimed at preventing the public consumption and/or display of marijuana, marijuana consumers are being forced to enjoy their legally purchased products behind closed doors. Take Denver for example. In 2013, City Council members passed an ordinance that established fines of up to $999 for those who are caught smoking in a public space. This left in state consumers with nowhere to consume their marijuana other than a private residence, and left out-of-state consumers with no legal place to consume at all.

    After the new law was put into place, Denver police officers issued more than 650 tickets within the first year, compared to just over 117 for the previous year. This massive increase of 461 percent in citations speaks volumes to the obvious need for a more thoughtful approach. It just doesn’t make sense to provide a legal avenue for adults to purchase marijuana while simultaneously applying restrictions that severely limit the act of consuming it. It’s fairly simple, marijuana consumers deserve similar rights that our society typically affords to someone who enjoys a glass of wine at a local wine bar after an exhausting day.

    Hopefully this situation will soon change. Last week Denver NORML filed the Responsible Use initiative with the city of Denver. If passed by voters this November, it would legalize the establishment of private marijuana clubs for adults 21 and up. Passage of this ordinance would be a historic first step in moving towards the ultimate goal of normalizing the consumption of marijuana in our country. The initiative would provide responsible adults a legally defined space where marijuana could be consumed and shared with other like-minded adults — a simple, yet necessary accommodation for states that have passed some form of legalization. It’s time for marijuana consumers to embrace the idea that just like any other consumer focused industry, we have rights.

    We have our work ahead of us: gathering signatures, voter outreach and coalition building will be our top priorities over the next few weeks. Even in a progressive city such as Denver, where marijuana is fairly popular, we must work to earn the support non-consumers to ensure a victory on this issue. I believe we can accomplish this by offering a pragmatic initiative that will focus on the basics. There are plenty of places to grab a drink or a quick bite to eat, but we as marijuana consumers have no where to legally consume marijuana other than the privacy of someone’s home. If we focus on what is truly needed, I believe we can increase our chances of being successful this November.

    To learn more about the Responsible Use Initiative or to get involved, please visit the campaign’s website by clicking, here!

  • by Paul Armentano, NORML Deputy Director March 21, 2016

    marijuana_gavelSupreme Court justices today declined to consider a 2014 suit challenging the legality of Colorado’s regulations permitting the state-licensed production and retail sale of cannabis to adults.

    Justices decided in a 6-2 vote to reject the lawsuit, filed by Nebraska Attorney General Jon Bruning and Oklahoma Attorney General E. Scott Pruitt, which sought to strike down Colorado’s law on the basis that it is “fundamentally at odds” with the federal Controlled Substances Act. A majority of the Court turned back the petition in an unsigned opinion, while Justices Clarence Thomas and Samuel Alito dissented.

    The plaintiffs in the suit now say that they are contemplating filing a similar legal challenge in federal district court.

    NORML Legal Counsel Keith Stroup previously described the lawsuit as “more political theater than a serious legal challenge.”

  • by Paul Armentano, NORML Deputy Director December 10, 2015

    legalization_pollNearly one out of two tourists visiting to Colorado acknowledge that their decision is motivated by the state’s permissive attitude toward marijuana, according to the findings of a just-released study commissioned by the Colorado Tourism Office.

    Among Colorado vacationers surveyed, 49 percent said that cannabis’ legal status influenced their decision, with 22 percent of them saying that it was “extremely influential.”

    A record number of tourists visited the state in 2014. Recreational sales of cannabis to adults became legal in Colorado on January 1, 2014.

    The results of a statewide Quinnipiac University poll commissioned this past November reported that 55 percent of Colorado voters support the state’s present marijuana policies, and that 53 percent of respondents believe that the policies have been “good for the state.”

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