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  • by Tom McCain, Executive Director, Peachtree NORML September 20, 2017

    Awful News

    My friend Stephen Bradley called me on Friday, September 14th and asked if I was sitting down. I knew it couldn’t be good news, but when he told me our mutual friend James Bell had died suddenly, I experienced several moments of simple denial. This just can’t be true, I thought. Then the enormity of the news dropped on me like a heavy stone as I realized how large a hole James’ death leaves in the politics of Marijuana Law Reform in Georgia.

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    The James Bell I Knew

    I met James in the fall of 2014 in Dublin, Georgia. He was there videoing a Justice for David Hooks rally. David had been killed in his own home during the execution of a fruitless search warrant, based on the word of an addict/thief who had burglarized David’s property the night before his death. Soon after, I met James again when I testified against the term no-knock warrant being written into black letter Georgia Law before a Senate Committee. We had an opportunity to talk for a while that day, discovering that we had several interests in common. We became friends and allies and called each other often. Over time, James shared the tragic story of his niece, Lori Knowles with me, and I understood his interest in David Hooks and no-knock warrants much better. I think the incident with Lori added fuel to the fire of James’ activism and drove him harder over the past 3 years.

    As James and I talked (and he could talk), I realized just how central a figure he was in the fight for cannabis law reform in Georgia. He was involved in the movement since at least as far back as the 70s, and his interest covered all things cannabis. From advocating the freedom to make personal, adult choices about smoking it, to supporting the use of medical marijuana, to reintroducing Hemp as a staple crop in Georgia, James was involved in it all. He truly believed that the re-legalization of cannabis could be accomplished here in Georgia. He was a constant presence around the Gold Dome when the Legislature was in session, both testifying on issues and videoing procedures. His easy way, his extensive knowledge, and his passion paved the way for good relationships with lawmakers. He was well-known and respected by many.

    James was keenly aware of the societal harm caused by the War on Marijuana. He and I often spoke of Harm Reduction during our conversations, and he felt that an arrest and subsequent criminal record for mere possession of a small amount of marijuana was unjust. No victim, no crime.  He believed a grassroots approach to the problem at the Municipal level, combined with lobbying for change at the State level was the key. He testified in advocacy of Harm Reduction ordinances in Clarkston and Atlanta. He tried in Temple but was met by a crowd of rabid Prohibitionists who hijacked the Town Hall meeting. Clarkston passed their ordinance, and the City hasn’t fallen into a sinkhole. Atlanta is still considering it and the upcoming Mayoral election has several candidates with pro-decriminalization planks in their platforms.

    What Now?

    I will miss talking to James. I’ll miss his counsel. I’ll miss his laugh. I’ll miss seeing him around the Capitol. I know in my heart, though that he would want us to carry on. No one can ever fill James’ shoes, but others will step up.  Others will ensure his legacy and work continue. I’ll be among them.

    Go rest high upon that mountain,
    Son your work on Earth is done

    I’ll see ya further on!

  • by Kevin Mahmalji, NORML Outreach Coordinator August 8, 2017

    blogstickerNORML Chapters around the country are currently organizing efforts to engage their representatives on the issue of marijuana law reform during the upcoming congressional recess where members of the House and Senate will host town hall meetings in their districts. In addition to providing unique opportunities for face-to-face interactions with congressional representatives, town hall meetings provide our volunteers the chance to promote NORML’s message of ending the federal prohibition of marijuana to an audience of politically engaged voters.

    With the help of Town Hall Project, a nonprofit organization that’s focused on empowering constituents across the country to have face-to-face conversations with their elected representatives, we have identified almost a dozen town hall meetings taking place in cities with strong NORML representation. To take advantage, NORML leadership is focused on mobilizing our supporters to ask specific questions and encourage their representatives to support legislation that will: protect consumers and businesses in legal marijuana states, expand access to medical marijuana for veterans, stop civil forfeiture and end the federal prohibition of marijuana.

    Below is a list of town hall meetings that NORML Chapters will be targeting. We will continue to update the list as new town hall meetings are announced:

    (Updated: 8/14/2017)

    Rep. Ruben Kihuen (Democrat, NV-4)
    Tuesday Aug 1, 2017 at 09:00 AM
    Walnut Community Center
    3075 N Walnut Rd, Las Vegas, NV 89115

    Rep. Dana Rohrabacher (Republican, CA-48)
    Tuesday Aug 1, 2017 at 6:30 PM
    Aliso Niguel High School Gym
    28000 Wolverine Way, Aliso Viejo, CA 92656

    Rep. Bradley Byrne (Republican, AL-1)
    Thursday August 3 2017 at 3:00 PM
    Gulf Shores City Hall
    1905 W 1st St, Gulf Shores, AL 36542

    Rep. Steve Cohen (Democrat, TN-9)
    Saturday August 5, 2017 at 10:00 AM
    Memphis College of Art
    1930 Poplar Ave, Memphis, TN 38104

    Rep. Will Hurd (Republican, TX-23)
    Sunday August 6, 2017 at 1:00 PM
    Horizon City Dairy Queen
    800 N Zaragoza Rd, El Paso, TX 79907

    Rep. G.K. Butterfield (Democrat, NC-1)
    Tuesday August 8, 2017 at 6:00 PM
    Bertie High School
    716 US-13, Windsor, NC 27983

    Rep. Donald Norcross (Democrat, NJ-1)
    Wednesday August 9, 2017 at 7:30 PM
    Carmen Tilelli Community Center
    820 Mercer St, Cherry Hill, NJ 08002

    Rep. Glenn Thompson (Republican, PA-5)
    Thursday, August 10, 2017 at 8:00 PM
    WPSU
    100 Innovation Blvd, University Park, PA 16802

    Rep. Adam Smith (Democrat, WA-9)
    Saturday August 12, 2017 at 10:00 AM
    Foster High School Performing Arts Center
    4242 S 144th St, Tukwila, WA 98168

    Derek Kilmer (Democrat, WA-6)
    Sunday August 13, 2017 at 2:00 PM
    Aberdeen High School Auditorium
    410 N G St, Aberdeen, WA 98520

    Jimmy Panetta (Democrat, CA-20)
    Monday August 14, 2017 at 6:00 PM
    California State University Monterey Bay World Theater
    5260 6th Ave, Seaside, CA 93955

    Senator Maria Cantwell (Democrat, Senate)
    Tuesday August 15, 2017 at 6:00 PM
    Gonzaga University, Cataldo Hall, The Boone Room
    502 E Boone Ave, Spokane, WA 99258

    Rep. Patrick T. McHenry (Republican, NC-9)
    Wednesday, August 16, 2017 at 6:00 PM
    Cleveland Community College – Mildred Keeter Auditorium
    137 S Post Rd, Shelby, NC 28152

    Rep. Gary Palmer (Republican, AL-6)
    Thursday, August 17, 2017 at 6:30 PM
    North Highlands Baptist Church
    4851 15th Street Rd, Hueytown, AL 35023

    Rep. David Scott (Democrat, GA-13)
    Saturday August 19, 2017 at 09:00 AM
    Mundy’s Mill High School
    9652 Fayetteville Rd, Jonesboro, GA 30238

    Rep. Trent Franks (Republican, AZ-8)
    Tuesday August 22, 2017 at 7:00 AM
    The Colonnade
    19116 N Colonnade Way, Surprise, AZ 85374

    Rep. Tom Rice (Republican, SC-7)
    Chapin Memorial Library Meeting Room
    Tuesday August 22, 2017 at 10:00 AM
    400 14th Ave N, Myrtle Beach, SC 29577

    Rep. Bradley Byrne (Republican, AL-1)
    Wednesday, August 23, 2017 at 3:00 PM
    John L. LeFlore Magnet High School,
    700 Donald St, Mobile, AL 36617

    Rep. Danny K. Davis (Democrat, IL-7)
    Thursday August 24, 2017 at 7:00 AM
    Oak Park Village Hall
    123 Madison St, Oak Park, IL 60302

    Rep. Rodney Davis (Republican, IL-13)
    Friday August 25, 2017 at 8:30 AM
    Litchfield City Hall
    120 E Ryder St, Litchfield, IL 62056

    Rep. Ami Bera (Democrat, CA-7)
    Tuesday August 29, 2017 at 10:00 AM
    Folsom Public Library
    411 Stafford St, Folsom, CA 95630

    Rep. Jim Sensenbrenner (Republican WI-5)
    Saturday September 9, 2017 at 1:00 PM
    Elm Grove Village Park
    13600 Juneau Blvd, Elm Grove, WI 53122

    To support these efforts, NORML has prepared a guide to town hall meetings, as well as a list of questions specific to each representative. If you would like to participate or want a copy of either document, please email chapters@NORML.org.

  • by Kevin Mahmalji, NORML Outreach Coordinator July 27, 2017

    PhillyNORML-logo-720w

    With the recent passage of a marijuana decriminalization ordinance, the City of York joins Philadelphia, State College, Pittsburgh and Harrisburg in no longer criminalizing the simple possession of small amounts of marijuana. Following several meetings to discuss the proposal, members of city council heard from Chris Goldstein, former executive director of Philadelphia NORML and Les Stark, executive director of the Keystone Cannabis Coalition. Both spoke in support of the proposal and even provided encouraging data showing a decline in marijuana arrests in other municipalities that adopted similar measures.

    “Towns across Pennsylvania are moving away from handcuffs and towards issuing fines instead, that’s good news in a state where we have more than 18,000 consumers arrested every year,” said Chris Goldstein.

    Similar to other decriminalization measures that have been adopted by municipalities in the Commonwealth, the ordinance approved by the York City Council replaces criminal prosecution and potential jail time with a simple fine or community service for those possessing less than 30 grams of marijuana. The ordinance also decriminalized the public consumption of marijuana.

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    While local governments across Pennsylvania continue to adopt measures to reduce the penalty for personal possession of marijuana from jail time to a simple fine, state lawmakers have been more apprehensive on the issue. But advocates are hopeful things will change as the conversation advances on the local level. “This really puts the pressure on legislators in Harrisburg to vote on statewide bills and start having the bigger conversation about full legalization,” added Goldstein.

    Read more here: http://www.ydr.com/story/news/2017/07/19/york-city-council-passes-bill-decriminalize-possession-small-amounts-marijuana/480013001/

    For future updates on marijuana law reform efforts in Pennsylvania, follow Philly NORML by visiting their website and Facebook page!

  • by NORML July 21, 2017

    According to recently released polling data from Gallup, nearly half of all Americans have tried marijuana at one point in their lives, an all time high since they began asking the question in 1969 when only 4% of Americans admitted to having tried the substance.

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    Additionally, 12% of survey respondents said they currently consume marijuana.

    gallup2

    Gallup concludes:

    “With 29 U.S. states allowing medical marijuana use, and eight allowing recreational use, legal cannabis is taking hold in American society.

    There may be obstacles to marijuana becoming fully “accepted” in the United States. Attorney General Sessions appears to be cracking down on marijuana use, and driving under the influence of pot continues to be a concern for many.

    Despite legal hurdles, however, a record-high percentage of Americans say they have tried marijuana.
    Smoking pot is still not as prevalent as cigarette smoking in the U.S., at 17%, but current marijuana usage is about as high as it has been.

    If more states legalize the drug, regular usage — or at least experimenting with marijuana — could rise. Legality may confer a certain societal acceptance of the drug. Sessions’ hopes to prosecute state-level marijuana crimes may prove to be a hindrance, but it is unlikely this multibillion-dollar industry will be stopped anytime soon.”

    Read the full survey results here.

  • by Erik Altieri, NORML Executive Director May 23, 2017

    Duterte_delivers_his_message_to_the_Filipino_community_in_Vietnam_during_a_meeting_held_at_the_Intercontinental_Hotel_on_September_28If the latest comments and memos coming out of Attorney General Sessions’ Department of Justice didn’t raise concerns about the Trump Administration’s potential plans to reignite our nation’s failed war on drugs, his recent call with Philippines President Rodrigo Duterte should sound alarm bells.

    A reminder: President Duterte has extrajudicially executed thousands of his own citizens on drug charges during his tenure leading the country.

    The Washington Post received a transcript of the phone call and describes Trump’s comments on Duterte’s drug “policy” as follows:

    …in their call [Trump] praised Duterte for doing an “unbelievable job on the drug problem.”

    “Many countries have the problem, we have the problem, but what a great job you are doing and I just wanted to call and tell you that,” Trump said, according to the transcript.

    After Duterte replied that drugs are the “scourge of my nation now and I have to do something to preserve the Filipino nation,” Trump appeared to take a swipe at his predecessor, Barack Obama, who had canceled a bilateral meeting with Duterte after the Philippines leader insulted him.

    “I understand that and fully understand that and I think we had a previous president who did not understand that,” Trump said.

    Read the full story in The Washington Post here.

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