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  • by Paul Armentano, NORML Deputy Director December 28, 2016

    MAWith little debate, House and Senate lawmakers voted today to significantly amend Massachusetts’ voter-initiated marijuana law.

    The vote sets the stage to delay the establishment of state-licensed marijuana retail facilities from January 1, 2018 to July 1, 2018. Governor Charlie Baker, who campaigned against the initiative, must still sign off on the law change. [UPDATE: Gov. Baker signed the language into law on Friday, December 30.] Separate provisions in the law eliminating penalties for adults who privately possess or grow personal use quantities of cannabis took effect on December 15.

    According to The Boston Globe, the “extraordinary move” by lawmakers took place in an “informal” legislative session with “just a half-dozen legislators present.”

    NORML had been urging lawmakers to adopt the law swiftly as voters intended, and it continues to urge Massachusetts voters to take action.

    NORML Executive Director Erik Altieri called lawmakers’ decision a “slap in the face” to the nearly two million Massachusetts voters who decided in favor of Question 4 on Election Day.

    “The arrogance and hubris lawmakers are showing toward voters is remarkable,” he said. “The voters have spoken and it is incumbent on legislators to carry out their will. Massachusetts was the first state in the nation to impose criminal penalties on marijuana – doing so in 1914. After more than a century of this failed policy, it is time to bring prohibition to an end in Massachusetts.”

    The move by lawmakers to delay aspects of the law’s implementation is not altogether surprising, as politicians and bureaucrats had previously discussed restricting home cultivation as well as raising the proposed sales taxes rate on marijuana sales.

  • by Paul Armentano, NORML Deputy Director January 28, 2016

    ballot_box_leafMore than three out of five New Mexicans believe that state law ought to be amended to permit retails sales of marijuana to adults, according to statewide polling data provided by Research & Polling Inc. and commissioned by the Drug Policy Alliance.

    Sixty-one percent of respondents said that they supported legislation to regulate and tax retail sales of marijuana to those age 21 and over. Respondents’ support rose to 69 percent when pollsters indicated that sales taxes would be used to fund health-related programs.

    Majority support for regulating the adult use of cannabis have previously been reported in a number of other state and national surveys.

    Legislation to allow for the retail sale and adult use of cannabis, House Bill 75 and Senate Joint Resolution 5, is presently pending in the New Mexico legislature. Similar legislation is pending in over a dozen other states, including Arizona, Florida, Georgia, New Hampshire, Kentucky, and Vermont.

  • by Paul Armentano, NORML Deputy Director September 30, 2015

    Oregon: Retail Marijuana Sales To BeginRegulations permitting state-licensed medical cannabis dispensaries to also engage in retail sales to those ages 21 or older take effect on Thursday, October 1. An estimated 200 facilities are anticipated to begin providing cannabis to adults.

    Customers will be permitted to purchase up to a quarter ounce of herbal cannabis daily, as well as up to four non-flowering plants, but they will not be allowed to obtain cannabis-infused products until early next year.

    Legislation approved by voters in November and enacted on July 1 allows those over the age of 21 to legally possess up to one ounce of cannabis and/or to engage in the non-commercial cultivation of up to four marijuana plants (yielding up to eight ounces of marijuana). Separate provisions in the law license, regulate, and tax retail sales of cannabis beginning next year. However, separate legislation (Senate Bill 460) signed into law in August permits licensed medical dispensaries the option to engage in provisional, tax-free retail sales of cannabis until January 4, 2016.

    Colorado and Washington presently permit retail sales of cannabis, while similar regulations are forthcoming in Alaska. (A voter-initiated law in the District of Columbia permits adults to possess and grow marijuana legally, but does not provide for a regulated commercial cannabis market.)

    Tax revenue derived from retail cannabis sales in Washington have total $90 million in the first 15 months, while taxes derived from sales in Colorado have totaled $70 million in the past year.

  • by Paul Armentano, NORML Deputy Director July 29, 2015

    Democrat Gov. Kate Brown has signed emergency legislation expediting the retail sales of cannabis in Oregon to those age 21 and older.

    Senate Bill 460 permits state-licensed medical marijuana dispensaries to also engage in cannabis sales to non-medical persons beginning on October 1, 2015. Adults will be allowed to purchase up to one-quarter ounce of cannabis per visit per day.

    Initiated legislation approved by voters in November and enacted on July 1 allows those over the age of 21 to legally possess up to one ounce of cannabis and/or to engage in the non-commercial cultivation of up to four marijuana plants (yielding up to eight ounces of marijuana). Separate provisions in the law permitting the licensed production and retail sale of cannabis to adults were not anticipated to go into effect until next summer. Senate Bill 60 permits adults to legally obtain cannabis from dispensaries during this interim period.

    Alaska, Colorado, Oregon and Washington permit adults to legally possess and purchase limited quantities of marijuana for their own personal use. The District of Columbia also allows adults to possess and grow marijuana legally, but does not provide for as regulated commercial cannabis market. All of these measures were enacted by the passage of voter initiatives.

  • by Paul Armentano, NORML Deputy Director July 2, 2014

    Washington’s first wave of state-licensed cannabis retail stores are anticipated to open for business next week. Initiative 502, approved by a majority of voters in November 2012, authorizes the establishment of state-licensed cannabis producers and retail sellers.

    The state’s Liquor Control Board is expected to begin issuing licenses on Monday, July 7. An estimated 20 retail stores are anticipated to open their doors later in the week. Similar state-sanction stores have been operating in Colorado since January 1.

    With only a small number of stores likely to be operational at first, regulators anticipate that consumers’ demand for legal cannabis may initially outpace supply. In Colorado, retailers struggled initially to meet consumer demand, resulting in temporarily inflated retail prices for cannabis. Prices have steadily fallen in Colorado as additional retailers have opened for business.

    Since the passage of Initiative 502, police filings for low-level marijuana offenses have fallen from over 5,000 annual arrests to just over one hundred.

    [UPDATE: Here is a list (c/o of the Seattle Post Intelligencer) of the first 24 state-licensed stores:

    WHIDBEY ISLAND CANNABIS COMPANY — 5826 S KRAMER RD STE, Langley
    WESTSIDE420 RECREATIONAL — 4503 OCEAN BEACH HWY, Longview
    VERDE VALLEY — 4007 MAIN ST, Union Gap
    TOP SHELF CANNABIS – 3857 HANNEGAN RD, Bellingham
    THE HAPPY CROP SHOPPE — 50 ROCK ISLAND RD, East Wenatchee
    SPOKANE GREEN LEAF — 9107 N COUNTRY HOMES BLVD, Spokane
    SPACE – 3111 S PINE ST, Tacoma
    SATORI/INSTANT KARMA — 9301 N DIVISION ST, Spokane
    NEW VANSTERDAM — 6515 E. MILL PLAIN BLVD, Vancouver
    MARGIE’S POT SHOP — 405 E STUEBEN, Bingen
    MAIN STREET MARIJUNA — 2314 MAIN ST, Vancouver
    HIGH TIME STATION — 1448 BASIN ST NW, Ephrata
    GREEN THEORY — 10697 MAIN ST STE B, Bellevue
    GREEN STAR CANNABIS — 1403 N DIVISION ST, Spokane
    FREEDOM MARKET — 820A WESTSIDE HWY, Kelso
    CREATIVE RETAIL MANAGEMENT — 7046 PACIFIC AVE,Tacoma
    CASCADE KROPZ — 19129 SMOKEY POINT BLVD, Arlington
    CANNABIS CITY — 2733 4TH AVE S, Seattle
    BUD HUT — 1123 E STATE ROUTE 532, Camano Island
    AUSTIN LOTT — 29 HORIZON FLATS RD, Winthrop
    ALTITUDE – 260 MERLOT DR, Prosser
    4US RETAIL — 23251 HWY 20, Okanogan
    420 CARPENTER — 422 CARPENTER RD, Lacey
    2020 SOLUTIONS – 2018 IRON ST, Bellingham
    ]

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