Loading

Municipal

  • by Kevin Mahmalji, NORML Outreach Director July 26, 2019

    The City of Jacksonville, Florida could join a growing list of cities around the country that have embraced a more pragmatic approach for dealing with marijuana-related offenses on the local level. Currently more than a dozen Florida municipalities have decriminalized the possession of 20 grams or less of marijuana including: Alachua County, Broward County, Cocoa Beach, Hallandale Beach, Key West, Miami Beach, Miami-Dade County, Orlando, Osceola County, Palm Beach County, Port Richey, Tampa, Volusia County, and West Palm Beach County.

    Jacksonville Residents Click Here to Send a Message to your Council Representatives 

    Citing concerns about the collateral consequences of a marijuana charge and the disproportionate impact marijuana prohibition continues to have on communities of color, Council Member Garrett Dennis recently introduced the, “Jacksonville Civil Citation for Small Quantity Marijuana Possession Ordinance.” If approved, the ordinance would impose a $100 fine for possessing 20 grams or less of marijuana instead of jail time. 

    “During my reelection campaign, I spoke to many citizens whose lives were thrown into a downward spiral due to possessing minimal amounts of marijuana. Families were in debt because of legal issues, loss of employment or the inability to secure gainful employment; based on these misdemeanor arrests,” said Council Member Dennis. 

    Read more from First Coast News

    To support this effort, Council Member Dennis has announced a series of community meetings. Each meeting is free to attend and open to the public. 

    Date:  Saturday, July 27, 2019                                         

    Time: 10:30 a.m.

    Location: South Mandarin Library, 12125 San Jose Blvd., Jacksonville, FL 32223

    Date: Monday, July 29, 2019

    Time: 6:00 p.m.

    Location: Bennie Furlong Senior Center, 281 19th Ave S, Jacksonville Beach, FL 32250

    Date: Tuesday, July 30, 2019    

    Time: 6:00 p.m.

    Location: Legends Center, 5130 Soutel Drive, Jacksonville, FL 32208

    Date: Monday, August 5, 2019  

    Time: 6:30 p.m.

    Location: Webb Wesconnett Library, 6887 103rd Street, Jacksonville, FL 32210

    Click Here to Review NORML’s Decriminalization Report

           Marijuana policy should be evidence based. Dispel the myths with the NORML Fact Sheets. Follow NORML on FacebookInstagram and Twitter and become a member today!

                                                                                                                              

  • by Paul Armentano, NORML Deputy Director June 14, 2019

    Marijuana HempMembers of the Cincinnati City Council have voted in favor of a municipal measure eliminating criminal and civil penalties for marijuana possession. The new local law takes effect on July 12.

    Under the ordinance, activities involving the possession of up to 100 grams of marijuana will no longer be subject to local penalties. Cincinnati is one of a growing number of Ohio municipalities, including Athens and Toledo, to eliminate marijuana possession penalties.

    The Council is also expected to vote imminently on a separate ordinance facilitating the expungement of prior marijuana possession convictions.

    Under state law, the possession of up to 100 grams of cannabis is classified as a minor misdemeanor offense.

    Additional information is available in the NORML report, Local Decriminalization, online here.

  • by Jamie Kacz, Executive Director of NORML KC June 5, 2019

    With the arrival of summer time in Kansas City, we want to welcome everyone to take part in our Summer Seminar Series. All of these FREE events will focus on rules and regulations of Amendment 2, now Article XIV, for patients and caregivers. These events will have a special topic each month and everyone will have time for Q&A. One of our main objectives for these seminars is to ensure patients have free resources and education around the new medical marijuana program.

    Donate today to support our efforts!

    We will kick off our Summer Seminars with a discussion on how to navigate the finalized rules of Amendment 2/Article XIV from a patient and caregiver perspective, and how to be compliant under the new law. Attendees will also learn how to work with their physicians and clinics to acquire legal MMJ recommendations for qualifying patients, what steps are involved in the process, and what to expect after receiving a recommendation. We will be breaking all of this information down into easy-to-understand steps. Join us at Unity Temple on June 8 from 2pm-5pm! This location is accessible and the general public is welcome to attend.

    Special Guest Speakers:
    Emily Branch, Director of The Green Clinics
    A physician from The Green Clinics
    Jana Lappin, Pharmacist and Co-owner of Missouri Cannabis Clinic
    Pat Talks Law

    Save the Date for our next Summer Seminars on July 20 and August 17!

     We would like to thank everyone that attended the Missouri NORML Spring Conference in April. Our keynote speaker for the event was NORML Executive Director Erik Altieri. The day was filled with several additional speakers including Missouri State Representative Brandon Ellington, Director of Missouri’s Medical Marijuana Program Lyndall Fraker, and Paul E. Callicoat, M.D. Thank you to Chris Smith for documenting our event and sharing the pictures in this newsletter!

    Please support our efforts by making a one-time donation! We’re also looking for volunteers to help move our chapter forward. If you want to help by donating time, your expertise or sponsor an event, please email us at newnormlkc@gmail.com. 

    Marijuana policy should be evidence based. Help dispel the myths with NORML’s Fact Sheets! For more information follow NORML KC on Facebook, and visit our website!

  • by Paul Armentano, NORML Deputy Director May 14, 2019

    City lawmakers have successfully passed a pair of municipal bills limiting situations where those seeking employment or on probation may be drug tested for past cannabis exposure.

    Democratic Mayor Bill DeBlasio on Thursday permitted both bills to become law absent his signature.

    Commenting on the new laws, NORML Executive Director Erik Altieri said: “These reforms protect the civil liberties of New Yorkers and promote fair treatment. There is no reason to treat cannabis consumers as second class citizens. We shouldn’t penalize those who privately use cannabis responsibly from gainful employment, nor should the courts seize upon this behavior as a justification to return someone to jail or prison.”

    Bill No. 1427 states, “The department of probation shall not require individuals to submit to marijuana testing unless a determination is made, based on an individuals’ history and circumstances, that abstinence from marijuana is necessary to otherwise lead an otherwise law-abiding life.” The new law takes immediate effect.

    Bill No. 1445 states, “[I]t shall be an unlawful discriminatory practice for an employer, labor organization, employment agency, or agent thereof to require a prospective employee to submit to testing for the presence of any tetrahydrocannabinols or marijuana in such prospective employee’s system as a condition of employment.” Exceptions to the new law include those employees seeking certain safety sensitive positions – such as police officers or commercial drivers – or those positions regulated by federal drug testing guidelines. The law take effect in one year.

    Additional information is available from the NORML fact-sheet, “Marijuana Legalization and Impact on the Workplace,” online here.

  • by Paul Armentano, NORML Deputy Director April 22, 2019

    Cannabis Penalties[Update: The Jefferson County Sheriff’s Office announced on Friday, 4/26, that the announced cite-and-release program is on hold. No further details were provided.] A spokesperson for the Jefferson County (population: 658,000) Sheriff’s Office announced today that local law enforcement will begin citing, rather than arresting, low-level marijuana offenders.

    Under the new policy, police will issue a summons to those who possess personal amounts of marijuana or cannabis-related paraphernalia. Offenders will no longer be arrested or booked. Those cited and released will still have to either pay a fine or appear in court at a later date. Those with prior cannabis violations will still be eligible to receive a summons.

    Under state law, marijuana possession is classified as a criminal misdemeanor, punishable by up to one-year in jail and a $6,000 fine.

    Similar cite and release programs are in place in other cities and counties around the country, including in Palm Beach County, Florida and in Harris County (Houston), Texas.

    Additional information is available from NORML’s ‘Local Decriminalization’ report, online here.

Page 1 of 612345...Last »