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  • by Kevin Mahmalji, NORML Outreach Director September 28, 2018

    We as advocates of marijuana law reforms have never been in a better position than we are today to further our cause. Prior to states like Colorado, Washington, Oregon, Nevada, and others, legalizing and regulating marijuana, there was very little data to support our arguments to end marijuana prohibition. But, things have changed.

    So, is the legalization and regulation of marijuana working? Of course it is, but we must be able to articulate why it’s working to be successful in our efforts. We can start by looking at some of the data regarding the impact marijuana legalization is having on public health and safety. Study after study published by the Journal of Economic Behavior and Organization, the National Academies of Sciences, the Centers for Disease Control, the Journal of Adolescent Health and the American Journal of Public Health are providing us with all the information we need to make fact-based, data-driven arguments in support of ending marijuana prohibition.

    Regardless if you’re looking at state-level data related to crime, teen access and use or the decline in opioid use, hospitalizations and overdose, the legalization and regulation of marijuana is having a positive impact. And this is no longer our opinion; it’s fact, backed by legitimate research and data. The information is there. We no longer have to speculate about the potential impacts marijuana legalization will have on public health and safety, and other areas of concern. We can now depend on facts and data to further our efforts to end marijuana prohibition.

    Touting the economic benefits of legalization such as tax revenues and job creation can also be helpful in our push to end marijuana prohibition. To date, there have been between 125,000 and 160,000 full-time jobs created as a result of the legalization and regulation of marijuana. This includes those who work directly with the plant (e.g., cultivation, bud tenders, infused products) as well as ancillary businesses such as packaging, gardening supplies and lighting companies. Regarding tax revenues, Nevada’s regulated adult-use program generated over $55 million within the first ten months of its roll out. While Colorado’s pulled in more than $245 million in tax revenue for 2017.

    If you’re working to advance marijuana law reform efforts on the local, state or federal level, these studies can be used to persuade opponents of legalization that ending marijuana prohibition is a step in the right direction, or at the very least, neutralize their prohibitionist rhetoric. Am I suggesting there’s no need to continue to closely monitor the impact marijuana legalization is having on public health and safety? Absolutely not.

    With only a handful of states enacting laws to legalize and regulate adult-use marijuana, the jury is certainly still out on whether or not marijuana can be regulated in a way that’s safe and productive for society, so I expect a healthy and thoughtful debate around the issue for years to come. However, since Congress approved the Marihuana Tax Act in 1937, we as advocates of marijuana law reforms have never had access to more fact-based evidence supporting our longstanding argument that ending marijuana prohibition is not only good public policy, it’s the right thing to do.

    For more than 45 years NORML chapters have been the driving force behind policy decisions on the local and state level. Have you connected with your local NORML chapter? If there isn’t one in your community, please email NORML Outreach Director Kevin Mahmalji at KevinM@NORML.org for help with starting your own!

    Ready to start a NORML chapter in your hometown? Click here to find out how!

  • by Kevin Mahmalji, NORML Outreach Director August 8, 2017

    blogstickerNORML Chapters around the country are currently organizing efforts to engage their representatives on the issue of marijuana law reform during the upcoming congressional recess where members of the House and Senate will host town hall meetings in their districts. In addition to providing unique opportunities for face-to-face interactions with congressional representatives, town hall meetings provide our volunteers the chance to promote NORML’s message of ending the federal prohibition of marijuana to an audience of politically engaged voters.

    With the help of Town Hall Project, a nonprofit organization that’s focused on empowering constituents across the country to have face-to-face conversations with their elected representatives, we have identified almost a dozen town hall meetings taking place in cities with strong NORML representation. To take advantage, NORML leadership is focused on mobilizing our supporters to ask specific questions and encourage their representatives to support legislation that will: protect consumers and businesses in legal marijuana states, expand access to medical marijuana for veterans, stop civil forfeiture and end the federal prohibition of marijuana.

    Below is a list of town hall meetings that NORML Chapters will be targeting. We will continue to update the list as new town hall meetings are announced:

    (Updated: 8/14/2017)

    Rep. Ruben Kihuen (Democrat, NV-4)
    Tuesday Aug 1, 2017 at 09:00 AM
    Walnut Community Center
    3075 N Walnut Rd, Las Vegas, NV 89115

    Rep. Dana Rohrabacher (Republican, CA-48)
    Tuesday Aug 1, 2017 at 6:30 PM
    Aliso Niguel High School Gym
    28000 Wolverine Way, Aliso Viejo, CA 92656

    Rep. Bradley Byrne (Republican, AL-1)
    Thursday August 3 2017 at 3:00 PM
    Gulf Shores City Hall
    1905 W 1st St, Gulf Shores, AL 36542

    Rep. Steve Cohen (Democrat, TN-9)
    Saturday August 5, 2017 at 10:00 AM
    Memphis College of Art
    1930 Poplar Ave, Memphis, TN 38104

    Rep. Will Hurd (Republican, TX-23)
    Sunday August 6, 2017 at 1:00 PM
    Horizon City Dairy Queen
    800 N Zaragoza Rd, El Paso, TX 79907

    Rep. G.K. Butterfield (Democrat, NC-1)
    Tuesday August 8, 2017 at 6:00 PM
    Bertie High School
    716 US-13, Windsor, NC 27983

    Rep. Donald Norcross (Democrat, NJ-1)
    Wednesday August 9, 2017 at 7:30 PM
    Carmen Tilelli Community Center
    820 Mercer St, Cherry Hill, NJ 08002

    Rep. Glenn Thompson (Republican, PA-5)
    Thursday, August 10, 2017 at 8:00 PM
    WPSU
    100 Innovation Blvd, University Park, PA 16802

    Rep. Adam Smith (Democrat, WA-9)
    Saturday August 12, 2017 at 10:00 AM
    Foster High School Performing Arts Center
    4242 S 144th St, Tukwila, WA 98168

    Derek Kilmer (Democrat, WA-6)
    Sunday August 13, 2017 at 2:00 PM
    Aberdeen High School Auditorium
    410 N G St, Aberdeen, WA 98520

    Jimmy Panetta (Democrat, CA-20)
    Monday August 14, 2017 at 6:00 PM
    California State University Monterey Bay World Theater
    5260 6th Ave, Seaside, CA 93955

    Senator Maria Cantwell (Democrat, Senate)
    Tuesday August 15, 2017 at 6:00 PM
    Gonzaga University, Cataldo Hall, The Boone Room
    502 E Boone Ave, Spokane, WA 99258

    Rep. Patrick T. McHenry (Republican, NC-9)
    Wednesday, August 16, 2017 at 6:00 PM
    Cleveland Community College – Mildred Keeter Auditorium
    137 S Post Rd, Shelby, NC 28152

    Rep. Gary Palmer (Republican, AL-6)
    Thursday, August 17, 2017 at 6:30 PM
    North Highlands Baptist Church
    4851 15th Street Rd, Hueytown, AL 35023

    Rep. David Scott (Democrat, GA-13)
    Saturday August 19, 2017 at 09:00 AM
    Mundy’s Mill High School
    9652 Fayetteville Rd, Jonesboro, GA 30238

    Rep. Trent Franks (Republican, AZ-8)
    Tuesday August 22, 2017 at 7:00 AM
    The Colonnade
    19116 N Colonnade Way, Surprise, AZ 85374

    Rep. Tom Rice (Republican, SC-7)
    Chapin Memorial Library Meeting Room
    Tuesday August 22, 2017 at 10:00 AM
    400 14th Ave N, Myrtle Beach, SC 29577

    Rep. Bradley Byrne (Republican, AL-1)
    Wednesday, August 23, 2017 at 3:00 PM
    John L. LeFlore Magnet High School,
    700 Donald St, Mobile, AL 36617

    Rep. Danny K. Davis (Democrat, IL-7)
    Thursday August 24, 2017 at 7:00 AM
    Oak Park Village Hall
    123 Madison St, Oak Park, IL 60302

    Rep. Rodney Davis (Republican, IL-13)
    Friday August 25, 2017 at 8:30 AM
    Litchfield City Hall
    120 E Ryder St, Litchfield, IL 62056

    Rep. Ami Bera (Democrat, CA-7)
    Tuesday August 29, 2017 at 10:00 AM
    Folsom Public Library
    411 Stafford St, Folsom, CA 95630

    Rep. Jim Sensenbrenner (Republican WI-5)
    Saturday September 9, 2017 at 1:00 PM
    Elm Grove Village Park
    13600 Juneau Blvd, Elm Grove, WI 53122

    To support these efforts, NORML has prepared a guide to town hall meetings, as well as a list of questions specific to each representative. If you would like to participate or want a copy of either document, please email chapters@NORML.org.

  • by Kevin Mahmalji, NORML Outreach Director July 27, 2017

    PhillyNORML-logo-720w

    With the recent passage of a marijuana decriminalization ordinance, the City of York joins Philadelphia, State College, Pittsburgh and Harrisburg in no longer criminalizing the simple possession of small amounts of marijuana. Following several meetings to discuss the proposal, members of city council heard from Chris Goldstein, former executive director of Philadelphia NORML and Les Stark, executive director of the Keystone Cannabis Coalition. Both spoke in support of the proposal and even provided encouraging data showing a decline in marijuana arrests in other municipalities that adopted similar measures.

    “Towns across Pennsylvania are moving away from handcuffs and towards issuing fines instead, that’s good news in a state where we have more than 18,000 consumers arrested every year,” said Chris Goldstein.

    Similar to other decriminalization measures that have been adopted by municipalities in the Commonwealth, the ordinance approved by the York City Council replaces criminal prosecution and potential jail time with a simple fine or community service for those possessing less than 30 grams of marijuana. The ordinance also decriminalized the public consumption of marijuana.

    man_smoking_joint

    While local governments across Pennsylvania continue to adopt measures to reduce the penalty for personal possession of marijuana from jail time to a simple fine, state lawmakers have been more apprehensive on the issue. But advocates are hopeful things will change as the conversation advances on the local level. “This really puts the pressure on legislators in Harrisburg to vote on statewide bills and start having the bigger conversation about full legalization,” added Goldstein.

    Read more here: http://www.ydr.com/story/news/2017/07/19/york-city-council-passes-bill-decriminalize-possession-small-amounts-marijuana/480013001/

    For future updates on marijuana law reform efforts in Pennsylvania, follow Philly NORML by visiting their website and Facebook page!

  • by Paul Armentano, NORML Deputy Director January 10, 2014

    Marijuana laws are changing across the nation. They are changing because stakeholders are becoming actively involved in their own liberation by joining groups like NORML, forming NORML chapters, and making their voices heard.

    NORML has always relied on the efforts of our regional affiliates – people like you – to personally spread the NORML message to local and state lawmakers. On Saturday, members of one such regional NORML affiliate, the northern Virginia chapter of NORML, presented an articulate, persuasive, and coordinated message to their elected officials: ‘It’s time to stop arresting responsible adults who consume cannabis.’ Their efforts are commendable – and necessary.

    As we begin the 2014 state legislative session, a session that promises to be the busiest session for marijuana law reform in our history, it is vital that stakeholders play and active and participatory role in the legislative process. You can do so by joining any one of the dozens of NORML chapters nationwide or by starting your own. You can also do so by regularly logging on to norml.org/act to learn about the latest pending marijuana law reform measures pending in your state. By visiting this page, NORML will also identify your local elected officials and provide you with the tools to contact him or her in support of marijuana law reform. By visiting NORML’s facebook page, following NORML on Twitter, and/or by signing up for NORML’s newsletter, you will also receive timely e-mail alerts informing you of when legislative hearings and key votes are taking place in your state.

    Today, the mainstream media, pundits, and elected officials are all talking about marijuana policy in unprecedented numbers. They are doing so because of people like you. Make your voice heard. Make your voice count. Get active; get NORML!